Tag: Rainbow trout

Leave a reply

Ohio Lake Erie Fishing Forecast

Lake Erie Sunset with fish net

Image via Wikipedia

COLUMBUS, OH – Lake Erie anglers should experience another year of diverse fishing opportunities during 2011, according to biologists with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

“When you consider the variety of species and sizes of fish that are available to Ohio anglers, we are optimistic about Lake Erie fishing prospects this year,” said Roger Knight, Lake Erie fisheries program manager for the Division of Wildlife.  “Weather is always the wild card on Lake Erie, but anglers who take advantage of seasonal fishing opportunities have good odds at catching walleye, yellow perch, smallmouth bass, white bass, and steelhead, often in combination during many trips.”

Lake Erie walleye and yellow perch fisheries are managed through an interagency quota system that involves Ontario, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio jurisdictions.  Each jurisdiction regulates their catches to comply with their agency’s quotas and minimize the risk of over-fishing these species.  Quotas for the upcoming fishing season are determined through consensus agreement by these jurisdictions through the Lake Erie Committee of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, which were just recently announced for 2011.

Lake Erie Walleye and Perch Limits

Ohio’s walleye and yellow perch bag limits were set after the March 25, 2011, LEC quota announcement, and will go into effect May 1, 2011.  As a result of the 2011 quota allocation, the walleye bag limit will be six from May 1, 2011 to February 29, 2012, and four from March 1, 2012 to April 30, 2012.  A 15-inch minimum size limit is in effect during the entire season.  The daily bag limit for walleye remains four fish per person during April 2011.  As a result of the 2011 quota allocation, the yellow perch bag limit will be 30 perch per angler in all Ohio waters from May 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012.  There is no minimum size limit on yellow perch.  Lake Erie anglers can find walleye and yellow perch bag limit information at ODNR offices, in special publications at bait and tackle shops, and on the Web at wildohio.com.

Lake Erie anglers have great access to fishing in the Western and Central basins due to the numerous public boat ramps, private marinas, and shoreline access areas.  Anglers also benefit from having access to the largest charter boat fleet on the Great Lakes.


Ohio walleye anglers will catch fish mostly from the 2007 and 2003 hatches, with some contributions from the 2001, 2005, 2006, and 2008 hatches.  Walleye from the moderate 2007 hatch will range from 17-22 inches long and will complement the larger 22- to 28-inch fish from the strong 2003 hatch as the major contributors to the Ohio catch.  Fish from the fair 2005 hatch should be in the 20- to 25-inch range.  Fast growing fish from the 2008 cohort will begin to contribute to the fishery.  Large walleye from strong hatches in the mid-1990s still persist in the population, providing “Fish Ohio” award (greater than 28 inches) opportunities.

“Fish from the 2007 hatch grew faster than expected last year and showed up prominently in our fishery in 2010, and they should dominate the Western Basin catch this summer,” said Knight.  “The 2003 hatch is still out there, and it will likely contribute many fish in the Central Basin fisheries, particularly as the waters warm up and large fish migrate eastward to cooler waters.”

Yellow Perch

Perch anglers should encounter fish ranging from 7- to 13-inches from the 2007, 2008, 2005, and 2003 hatches in this year’s fishery.  Lake wide, yellow perch numbers should be similar to levels observed in 2010 in the Western and Central basins.  Small fish from the weaker 2009 hatch are not expected to contribute much to the fishery.

“Overall, we expect to have good perch fishing in 2011, with the largest fish coming from the eastern part of the Central Basin,” said Knight.

Smallmouth Bass

Smallmouth bass fishing in 2011 is expected to be fair.  Although bass abundance remains below desired levels, those caught should be of excellent size (15 to 22 inches, weighing 2 to 6 pounds).  Some small fish may be encountered from recent good hatches and must be released as quickly as possible.  Bass fishing is best in areas with good bottom structure, which is available across much of the entire Ohio near-shore area.  A closed season remains in effect from May 1 through June 24, 2011, during which all black bass (smallmouth and largemouth) must be immediately released.  Beginning June 25, 2011, the daily bag limit for bass will remain at five fish, with a 14-inch minimum length limit.


Steelhead anglers should enjoy another year of good fishing in Ohio’s Lake Erie open waters and in tributaries throughout the fall, winter, and spring months.  Peak summer steelhead action on Lake Erie can be found offshore from June through August between Vermilion and Conneaut, with catches measuring 17 to 29 inches.  Most Lake Erie anglers troll for steelhead in deep waters using spoons with dipsy divers or downriggers until fish move close to shore in the fall.  The daily bag limit remains at five fish per person from May 16 to August 31, and two fish per angler between September 1 and May 15, with a 12-inch minimum size limit throughout the year.

White Bass

White bass will continue to provide excellent seasonal fishing opportunities in the Maumee and Sandusky rivers and in the open lake.  The catch will be dominated by hatches from 2007 and 2008, which will include 13- to 16-inch fish.  The moderate 2009 and strong 2010 hatches should contribute many 10- to 14-inch fish to the fishery.  Anglers should focus on major Western Basin tributaries during May and June and near-shore areas of the open lake during summer months.  There is no daily bag or size limit on white bass.

Anglers are also advised of numerous fishing opportunities in the bays and harbors on the Ohio shoreline.  These inlets offer excellent fishing for panfish including crappie and bluegill, as well as largemouth bass.  In early spring, anglers may also catch an occasional Northern pike or muskellunge in vegetated areas.

Anglers are reminded that fishing conditions on Lake Erie can change hourly and adjustments are often necessary to improve success.  Anglers should take into account factors such as water temperature, cloud cover, water clarity, boat traffic, wave action, structures, currents, and the amount of baitfish in the area.  Anglers are also reminded to carefully monitor Lake Erie weather and to seek safe harbor before storms approach.

Updated LAke Erie Fishing Reports Online

During the season, updated Lake Erie fishing reports are available online at wildohio.com and by calling 1-888-HOOKFISH.  Division of Wildlife staff members are available from 8 a.m.to 5 p.m. weekdays at our research station facilities at Fairport Harbor (440-352-4199) for Central Basin information and at Sandusky (419-625-8062) for Western Basin information.  For additional information on lodging, charter boat services and local launch ramps, contact one of the following lakeshore visitors’ bureaus:

Ashtabula County Convention & Visitors Bureau – 800-337-6746
Lake County Visitors Bureau – 800-368-5253
Convention & Visitors Bureau of Greater Cleveland – 800-321-1001
Visit Lorain County – 800-334-1673
Erie County Visitors Bureau – 800-255-3743
Sandusky County Visitors Bureau – 800-255-8070
Ottawa County Visitors Bureau – 800-441-1271
Greater ToledoConvention & Visitors Bureau – 800-243-4667
Ohio Division of Travel & Tourism – 800-BUCKEYE

Information on the Division of Wildlife’s Lake Erie research and management programs, fisheries resources, open lake and steelhead fishing reports, as well as maps and links to other Lake Erie web resources are available at wildohio.com: Be sure to choose the “Fishing” icon from the Division’s homepage, and then select “Lake Erie Fishing” from the list at the bottom of that page.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all.  Visit the ODNR Web site atohiodnr.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta

1 Reply

100 Days of Summer: Day 37- Trout Fishing Western PA

Ohiopyle Falls on the Youghiogheny River
Image via Wikipedia

Harrisburg, PA – Anglers fishing the Kinzua and Youghiogheny tailraces should find plenty of trout to keep them busy this fall.  The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) recently released yearling trout (6-9 inches) in the tailraces from their Pleasant Gap State Fish Hatchery. These fish are intermediate in size compared to a typical fingerling, which are stocked at less than the statewide minimum legal size of 7 inches, and to a typical adult trout, which are stocked at approximately 10-11 inches.

“These fish were surplus to the production goals of the Pleasant Gap facility and have been stocked in these tailraces to grow and become available to the anglers fishing these waters,” said Brian Wisner, chief of the PFBC’s Division of Fish Production. “The stockings offer a great opportunity for families to get outside this fall and enjoy the fishing at two very popular waters.”

In Warren County, the PFBC stocked rainbow trout in section 7 of the Allegheny River from the Kinzua Dam downstream to the confluence of Conewango Creek.

In Fayette County, the PFBC stocked brown and rainbow trout in sections 2 and 3 of the Youghiogheny River from the mouth of Casselman River downstream to the mouth of Ramcat Run and from the mouth of Ramcat Run downstream to State Route 0381.

To locate these stream sections and other great fishing destinations, click on the “County Guides” section of the PFBC website at www.fishandboat.com. Each year, trout fingerlings are stocked throughout the Commonwealth as part of the Put-Grow-Take program.  Information on all PFBC fingerling trout stockings is available at the following link: http://fishandboat.com/stock_fingerling.htm

The mission of the Fish and Boat Commission is to protect, conserve, and enhance the Commonwealth’s aquatic resources and provide fishing and boating opportunities. For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website atwww.fishandboat.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Leave a reply

Vermilion River Steelhead Trout Stocking

Vermilion River
Image by dyobmit via Flickr

FINDLAY, OH   – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife will be stocking steelhead trout in the Vermilion River on Friday, April 30, 2010 at 10:00 a.m.

Fifty-five thousand yearlings will be released at the Vermilion City Boat Launch.   These fish were raised in the Division of Wildlife’s Castalia Fish Hatchery.  The yearlings are 6-8 inches long when stocked, and will grow to a length of 18 inches by the end of the first year.

The Vermilion City Boat Launch is located one-half mile south of U.S. Route 6, off of West River Road.  A brief program will be included, and Division of Wildlife staff will be on hand to answer questions.  The public is invited.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Leave a reply

Ohio Free Fishing Days, May 1st and 2nd, 2010

{{en|Walleye (Sander vitreus) from the USFWS. ...
Image via Wikipedia

COLUMBUS, OH – Ohioans are encouraged to take advantage of “Free Fishing Days” on May 1 and 2 and experience the great fishing Ohio has to offer, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife. For these two days only, Ohio anglers may fish in any of the state’s public waters without having to buy a fishing license.

During the rest of the year, anglers 16 years of age and older are required to have a valid fishing license to take fish, frogs or turtles from Ohio waters.  An Ohio fishing license is one of the best recreation bargains available, costing only $19 a year for residents.

Ohio residents born on or before December 31, 1937 can obtain a free fishing license at any license vendor. Residents age 66 and older who were born on or after January 1, 1938 are eligible to obtain a reduced cost ($10) senior fishing license. A one-day fishing license is also available for $11, an amount that later can be applied toward the cost of an annual fishing license.  Fishing licenses are available at bait and tackle stores, outdoor outfitters, major department stores, as well as on the Internet at wildohio.com.

Ohio’s Free Fishing Days were established in 1993 to promote fishing and allow Ohioans to experience fishing before buying a license. The offer is open to Ohio residents, and extends to all public waters including Lake Erie and the Ohio River. An estimated 1.3 million people fish each year in Ohio.

Great fishing exists around the state and throughout the year. In late winter and early spring, anglers reel in excellent catches of steelhead trout and walleye from northern Ohio streams. Spring also means great saugeye and crappie fishing.  During the summer months, the fishing heats up on Lake Erie for yellow perch, walleye and smallmouth bass, while anglers on the Ohio River enjoy excellent striped bass fishing.

Tips For Fishing with Children

The Free Fishing Days weekend offers Ohioans of all ages the chance to experience the fun of fishing.  For anyone taking a young angler, there’s nothing more rewarding than teaching a kid to fish.  Here are some helpful tips:

  • Keep it simple. Consider the child’s age and skill level.  If this is their first time, shore fishing is recommended.
  • Kids like to catch fish. The size of fish doesn’t matter to kids.  But catching a fish—any fish—does.   Choose a pond, lake or stream where they will easily be able to catch a few fish.
  • Use simple tackle. A good rod and reel for kids costs between $15 and $30.  A spin-cast reel is easy to use and, after a few practice casts, kids usually have mastered it.
  • Bring along a camera. Children love to show off pictures of their “big catch.”
  • Keep the trip fun and short. Let the child have a good time, even if it means taking a break.  Take time out to explore and enjoy the time together.
  • Be patient. Plan on spending some time untangling lines, baiting hooks, landing fish, and taking pictures of big smiles and wiggling fish.  By concentrating all your attention on your young angler, you’ll likely be developing a fishing buddy for a lifetime.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Skip to toolbar