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March 30th: Trout Season Begins in 18 Counties in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhyn...

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 19)Anglers from 18 southeastern counties are gearing up for the March 30 opening of trout, which marks the unofficial start of the 2013 fishing season.
“The buildup to opening day is just as exciting as the day itself,” said John Arway, executive director of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). “Anglers are busy cleaning their gear, stocking up on supplies and hopefully buying a few new rods and reels. And stocking schedules are posted to the Commission’s website, so the last step for anglers is to pick the spots they want to fish that day.”
“I’ll be at Opossum Lake in Cumberland County to celebrate the reopening of the lake, and encourage the public to join us and try their hand at catching some of the rainbow trout we’re stocking there,” he added.
The 18 counties open March 30 include: Adams, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, and York.
April 13 is the traditional opening day for the rest of the state.
Visit the PFBC’s website to see detailed stocking schedules, which can be easily sorted by county. The schedule shows what waters will be stocked, the date and time, and a meeting place where volunteers can gather to help with the stocking.
“While opening day is one of the biggest fishing days of the year, it’s also one of the biggest social events,” Arway added. “Research shows that when it comes to fishing, anglers like being together with friends and family just as much as they like catching fish.”
The PFBC’s “great white fleet” of stocking trucks has been busy since mid-February replenishing Pennsylvania’s waterways with a fresh supply of brook, brown and rainbow trout. Every year the PFBC stocks about 3.2 million trout in waterways across the state.
More than 850,000 anglers buy a fishing license each year.
For the first time this year, anglers can purchase multi-year fishing licenses, including a resident three-year license for $64.70 or a resident five-year license for $106.70. Resident three-year and five-year trout permits cost $25.70 and $41.70.
A one-year resident fishing license costs $22.70 and a trout-salmon permit is $9.70. A license is required for anyone 16 and older. Licenses can be purchased at sporting goods stores and online at www.fishandboat.com.
Also, a media resources page contains web banners, high resolution photos and radio public service announcements for graphic artists and reporters to use.
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Mentored Youth Trout Day Begins March 23 in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Rainbow trout

English: Rainbow trout (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 18) — Young anglers and their adult mentors can get an early start to trout season by fishing one of 12 waters on March 23, the weekend before the regional opening day.
The 12 waters identified by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) are part of the Mentored Youth Trout Day, a new pilot project being launched within the 18-county southeast area that makes up the regional opening day.
During the day on these waters, kids under the age of 16 must register with the PFBC before joining a mentor angler, who must have a current fishing license and trout permit. They will then be able to fish on the Saturday before the southeast opener on the select waters from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Each person will be permitted to keep a combined species total of two fish, and the fish must be at least 7 inches in length. Other Commonwealth inland regulations apply on this day. It is unlawful to fish in waters designated under the Mentored Youth Trout Day without a valid fishing license or without being accompanied by a registered youth.
In partnership with Cabela’s, the PFBC is hosting a tagged-fish contest at all 12 waters during the Mentored Youth Day on March 23. Each tagged fish caught represents a prize package of a $20 Cabela’s gift card with a Zebco rod and reel special-edition set. All tags obtained during the day will need to be redeemed by mail using the PFBC’s tag redemption form. Only qualified individuals in the Mentored Youth Trout Day are eligible to participate. All tags to be redeemed must be mailed and postmarked by March 27.
The 12 Mentored Youth Trout Day waters include (by county):
Adams – Waynesboro Reservoir
Berks – Antietam Lake
Berks – Scotts Run Lake
Bucks – Levittown Lake
Cumberland – Children’s Lake
Cumberland – Doubling Gap Lake
Dauphin – Middletown Reservoir
Lancaster – Muddy Run Recreational Lake
Lebanon – Lions Lake
Lehigh – Lehigh Canal, Section 8
Montgomery – Deep Creek Dam/Green Lake
Schuylkill – Locust Lake
Registration will be accepted during March 23 at all sites, and on-line registration is available at: http://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouth.htm.
For Mentored Youth Trout Day contest rules, tag redemption forms and details, visithttp://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouthContest.htm.
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New Fishing Regulations for AEP Ponds in Ohio

English: Largemouth Bass Fishing

English: Largemouth Bass Fishing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

COLUMBUS, OH – New fishing regulations are now in place at American Electric Power (AEP) ponds and reservoirs, including AEP ReCreation Lands, Conesville Coal Lands and Avondale Wildlife Area for the 2013-2014 license year, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

Daily bag limits are enforced at all AEP ponds and reservoirs. The regulations apply to black bass and sunfishes in more than 350 ponds and lakes among more than 80,000 acres of AEP lands available for public fishing, hunting, hiking and camping in Ohio. New regulations are intended to help sustain the high-quality largemouth bass and bluegill fishing known in these waters.

The new black bass regulation is a 14-20-inch slot length limit developed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife that increases anglers’ chances of catching trophy bass. Anglers may keep two fish under 14 inches and one fish 20 inches or larger, for three fish per day (largemouth, smallmouth, or spotted bass, singly or in combination). However, anglers will not be allowed to keep any fish in the protected slot. This regulation applies to all AEP waters, and an angler’s daily limit will apply to all AEP lands collectively, and not just a particular pond or lake.

The new sunfish regulation is a 20-fish daily limit to ensure opportunities for a greater number of anglers to catch quality fish. This regulation will also apply to all AEP waters so an angler’s daily limit will apply to all AEP lands collectively, not just a particular pond or lake.

A permit is required to use AEP ponds and reservoirs. The permit is free and can be obtained from the AEP office in McConnelsville, AEP corporate offices, ODNR Division of Wildlife district offices, or any sporting goods and bait stores near the ReCreation areas.

New regulations were developed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife through review of data from fish surveys, creel surveys, consideration of management options, and extensive public input. More information can be found at wildohio.com in the 2013-2014 fishing regulations. Additional information about AEP lands is also available. An Ohio fishing license is required at all AEP ponds and reservoirs.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

 

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Ohio Free Fishing Days May 5-6

The Black River at its mouth at Lake Erie in L...

The Black River at its mouth at Lake Erie in Lorain, Ohio (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

COLUMBUS, OH – Ohioans are encouraged to take advantage of “Free Fishing Days” on May 5-6 and experience the great fishing Ohio has to offer. For these two days only, Ohio anglers may fish in any of the state’s public waters without having to buy a fishing license.

During the rest of the year, anglers 16 years and older are required to have a valid fishing license to take fish, frogs or turtles from Ohio waters. An Ohio fishing license is one of the best recreation bargains available, costing only $19 a year for residents.

Ohio residents born on or before Dec. 31, 1937, can obtain a free fishing license at any license vendor. Residents age 66 and older who were born on or after Jan. 1, 1938, are eligible to obtain a reduced cost senior fishing license for $10. A one-day fishing license is also available for $11, an amount that later can be applied toward the cost of an annual fishing license. Fishing licenses are available at bait and tackle stores, outdoor outfitters, major department stores, as well aswildohio.com.

Ohio’s Free Fishing Days were established in 1993 to promote fishing and allow Ohioans to experience fishing before buying a license. The offer is open to all Ohio residents and extends to all of Ohio’s public waters including Lake Erie and the Ohio River.

Great fishing exists around the state and throughout the year. An estimated 1.3 million people fish each year in Ohio. In late winter and early spring, anglers reel in excellent catches of steelhead trout and walleye from northern Ohio streams. Spring also means great saugeye and crappie fishing. During the summer months, the fishing heats up on Lake Erie for yellow perch, walleye and smallmouth bass, while anglers on the Ohio River enjoy excellent striped bass fishing.

The “Free Fishing Days” weekend offers Ohioans of all ages the chance to experience the fun of fishing. For anyone taking a young angler, there’s nothing more rewarding than teaching a kid to fish. Here are some helpful tips:

  • Keep it simple. Consider the child’s age and skill level. If this is their first time, shore fishing is recommended.
  • Kids like to catch fish. The size of fish doesn’t matter to kids. But catching a fish—any fish—does. Choose a pond, lake or stream where they will easily be able to catch a few fish.
  • Use simple tackle. A good rod and reel for kids costs between $15 and $30. A spin-cast reel is easy to use and, after a few practice casts, kids usually have mastered it.
  • Bring along a camera. Children love to show off pictures of their “big catch.”
  • Keep the trip fun and short. Let the child have a good time, even if it means taking a break. Take time out to enjoy the time together.
  • Be patient. Plan on spending some time untangling lines, baiting hooks, landing fish and taking pictures of big smiles and wiggling fish. When people concentrate all of their attention on their young angler, they will likely be developing a fishing buddy for a lifetime.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at www.ohiodnr.com.

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100 Days of Summer: June 4th- Junior Fishing Derby in NE Ohio

There are two Fishing Derbys on June 4th in Northeast Ohio:

  • Youth Fishing DerbyLake Milton – June 4, 10:30 AM – 2 PM at the Meshel picnic area. For kids 15 & under. (330) 654-4989.
  • Youth Fishing DerbyQuail Hollow – June 4, 9 AM – Noon at the Shady Lane pond. For kids  14 & under. (330) 877-6652.

For More Information, Check out the Calendar on the  Explore the Outdoors Home page.

For more Ideas on Fishing with the Kids, Check out ODNR’s Fishing with the Kids Page.

 

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Ohio Spring Trout Release Calendar

COLUMBUS, OH – Public fishing opportunities will be enhanced this spring when more than 80,700 rainbow trout, each measuring 10 to 13 inches long, are released into 48 Ohio lakes and ponds, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. The releases will take place between mid-March and mid-May; anglers are reminded that the daily catch limit for inland lakes is five trout.

Some locations will feature special, youth-only angler events on the day of the scheduled releases. Anglers age 16 and older must have an Ohio fishing license to fish the state’s public waters. Once the youth-only events have concluded, all other anglers may fish.

The 2011-2012 fishing license can be purchased now and is required on March 1. An annual resident fishing license costs $19 and is valid through February 29, 2012. A one-day fishing license is available and may be purchased for $11 by residents or non-residents. The one-day license may also be redeemed for credit towards purchase of an annual fishing license.

Ohio residents born on or before December 31, 1937 may obtain a free fishing license where licenses are sold. Persons age 66 and older who were born on or after January 1, 1938, and have resided in Ohio for the past six months, are eligible to purchase the reduced cost resident senior license for $10.

Additional information about spring trout releases is available by calling toll-free 1-800-WILDLIFE. Information is also available from Division of Wildlife district offices in Akron, Athens, Columbus, Findlay, and Xenia.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at ohiodnr.com.

Lake County Date/Notes
ADAMS LAKE ADAMS 3/18/2011
ANTRIM PARK LAKE FRANKLIN 4/22/2011
ASHLEY UPGROUND DELAWARE 5/7/2011 (youth only 10am – 1pm)
BARNESVILLE RES. #3 BELMONT 3/24/2011
BELMONT LAKE BELMONT 3/18/2011
BLUE LIME STONE PARK DELAWARE 4/1/2011
CANAL FULTON (OH CANAL #4) STARK 4/30/2011 (youth only 8am – 11am)
CENCI PARK POND FAIRFIELD 4/9/2011 (youth only 10am – 11:30pm)
CLARK LAKE CLARK 4/1/2011
DAVIS AUGLAIZE 4/21/2011
DELTA RESERVOIR #2 FULTON 3/31/2011
DOW LAKE ATHENS 3/31/2011
EAST HARBOR STATE PARK POND OTTAWA 4/23/2011
EYMAN PARK PONDS FAYETTE 4/30/2011 (youth only)
FOREST HILL POND CUYAHOGA 4/1/2011
FORKED RUN STATE PARK LAKE MEIGS 3/24/2011
GIERTZ LAKE HANCOCK 5/7/2011
HINCKLEY LAKE MEDINA 4/14/2011
JACKSON CITY RESERVOIR JACKSON 4/23/2011
JEFFERSON LAKE JEFFERSON 4/8/2011
LITTLE TURTLE POND SUMMIT 4/16/2011 (youth only 9am – 2pm)
MCKARNS LAKE WILLIAMS 4/21/2011
MILL CREEK LAKE MAHONING 4/21/2011
MONROE LAKE MONROE 3/17/2011
MT. GILEAD STATE PARK LAKE MORROW 4/8/2011
NEW LEXINGTON RESERVOIR PERRY 3/11/2011
OLANDER LAKE LUCAS 4/30/2011
PEARSON METRO PARK LUCAS 4/16/2011
PUNDERSON LAKE GEAUGA 4/16/2011 (youth only 9am – Noon)
QUARRY PARK POND MARION 3/25/2011
ROCKY FORK LAKE HIGHLAND 4/2/2011 (youth only 1pm – 4pm)
ROSE LAKE HOCKING 4/22/2011
RUSH RUN LAKE PREBLE 3/25/2011
SCHOONOVER LAKE ALLEN 4/14/2011
SHADOW LAKE CUYAHOGA 4/1/2011
SHELBY RESERVOIR #3 RICHLAND 3/31/2011
SILVER CREEK LAKE SUMMIT 4/15/2011
STONELICK LAKE CLERMONT 3/26/2011 (youth only 11am – 3pm)
SUNBURY DELAWARE 5/7/2011 (youth only 9am – 2pm)
SYCAMORE STATE PARK LAKE MONTGOMERY 3/24/2011
TIMBER RIDGE LAKE LAWRENCE 3/31/2011
TURKEY CREEK LAKE SCIOTO 4/30/2011
VAN WERT RESERVOIR #1 VAN WERT 4/30/2011 (youth only)
VESUVIUS LAKE LAWRENCE 4/14/2011
WEST LAKE RECREATION CENTER CUYAHOGA 4/1/2011
WHITE STAR QUARRY SANDUSKY 4/23/2011
WOLF RUN STATE PARK LAKE NOBLE 3/17/2011
YOCTANGEE PARK LAKE ROSS 3/26/2011 (youth only)
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Ice Safety Tips from Ohio DNR

Kairaus
Image via Wikipedia

No Funny Title- Just the Facts.

COLUMBUS, OH – Ohioans are reminded to use extreme caution during winter while venturing onto frozen waterways and to be prepared to handle an emergency should someone fall through the ice, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

As some of the lowest temperatures of the season arrive, some people may be tempted to venture out onto the ice and should be aware of basic safety tips, including being prepared for an emergency. ODNR offers these ice safety tips; additional tips can be found online at www.ohiodnr.com and through various other Internet web resources.

Ice Safety Tips:

  • Always remember that ice-covered water is never completely safe.
  • Anyone new to ice fishing, or interested in learning how to safely ice fish, should seek out a licensed ice-fishing guide. A list of certified guides is available at www.wildohio.com or by calling the ODNR Division of Wildlife, Sandusky office at (419) 625-8062. Ask at local bait shops about known areas of thin or dangerous ice.
  • Always go out with friends, letting others know when you will be on the ice and when you will return. Whenever possible, wrap a mobile phone in a plastic bag and take it with you.
  • Wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket or float coat. Life vests provide excellent flotation and protection from hypothermia.
  • Use safe alternatives to local streams or lakes for skating or sledding. Check with your local, state or metro park district to see where conditions are suitable for skating. Some state parks, including Delaware State Park in Delaware County and Dillon State Park in Muskingum County, offer free access to designated ice-skating areas.
  • Understand wind chill factors are relative temperature guides. Although a thermometer may read 40 degrees, a wind speed of 20 miles per hour can cause a body to lose heat as if the temperature was actually 18 degrees.
  • Carry two ice picks, screwdrivers or large nails to create leverage for pulling yourself out of the water. They are much more effective than bare hands. Also, carry a whistle or other noisemaker to alert people that you are in distress.
  • Dress in layers and add extra clothing for the head, neck, sides and groin, which are the primary heat-loss areas. Wool and modern synthetics are good fabric choices for clothing; cotton is slow to dry when wet.
  • Keep an extra set of clothes in your car in case you need dry clothing.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages. In addition to reducing reaction times, alcohol lowers your internal temperature and increases your chance of suffering hypothermia.
  • Never drive a vehicle, snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle onto ice. Leave this to professional guides. This is extremely dangerous and most insurance policies will not cover the vehicles of ice fishermen that have dropped through the ice.

The ODNR Division of Watercraft administers Ohio’s boating programs. The agency oversees watercraft registration and titling operations, provides funding to local communities for education, enforcement and boating access facilities, educates the public, and enforces boating laws on Ohio’s waterways. More information may be found online at www.ohiodnr/com/watercraft or by following the Division of Watercraft on Facebook or Twitter.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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100 Days of Summer: Day 11-Go Boating

Almost sunken boat.
Image via Wikipedia

Well, I’m taking the night off to re-coup a little. And I know I’m actually a day ahead: I posted once one mornaing and meant to schedule the after work post, but posted it in the evening instead. And I’ve kept caught up, even though I haven’t really gotten any ideas saved up.

So Here’s an easy one: Get the Boat Out. Go to Lake Milton, Berlin, Mosquito, Pymatuning State Park, Portage LAkes, Guilford Lake or any of the other area Lakes. Take your water skis, yourfishing poles, a picnic and the family. Have fun.

And, yes, I know the fishing page is in dire need of a makeover. it was one of the first pages I ever did and it kinda just sits there, getting no visits. I’ll start building it. I promise

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Consumption Advisory Lifted For Pymatuning

The Pymatuning Reservoir, a man made lake in O...
Image via Wikipedia

Harrisburg – The departments of Environmental Protection and Health, and the Fish and Boat Commission have lifted the “Do Not Eat” consumption advisory for all species of fish taken from Pymatuning Reservoir and Tamarack Lake in Crawford County. 

Fish tissue samples tested by the Fish and Boat Commission and Cornell University determined the large fish kills in both lakes were the result of a Columnaris outbreak. Columnaris is a naturally occurring bacterium that was triggered by several stressors, including rapidly warming waters during the spawning season.

The commonwealth’s Interagency Fish Consumption Advisory Technical Workgroup verified the findings. 

DEP also tested water quality and fish tissue samples. The preliminary results show no contaminants of concern for persons who consume fish from the lakes or for downstream water supplies.

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Consumption Advisory Spreads to Tamarack Lake

Harrisburg, May 28 – The departments of Environmental Protection and Health, and the Fish and Boat Commission today issued a “Do Not Eat” consumption advisory for all species of fish taken from Tamarack Lake in Crawford County while officials investigate the cause of a large fish kill in the lake.

A “Do Not Eat” consumption advisory was issued for the neighboring Pymatuning Reservoir yesterday following a series of fish kills there.

Tamarack Lake is owned by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and managed by the Fish and Boat Commission.

The Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources manages Pymatuning State Park and has announced that the park is open and there are no fishing, swimming or boating restrictions in place during the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

Water samples are being analyzed at the DEP laboratory in Harrisburg, and fish samples are being tested by the Fish and Boat Commission and at Cornell University.

The “Do Not Eat” consumption advisory will remain in place until investigators complete their analysis of fish tissue samples.

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