Category: Pennsylvania

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PA Smallmouth Bass Populations Showing Improvement, But Caution Still Advised

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Dec. 8) – Following nearly a decade of poor recruitment due to disease affecting young-of-the-year, the smallmouth bass populations in the Susquehanna and lower Juniata rivers are showing signs of improvement, according to information released today by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC).

Surveys conducted from 2013-2016 reveal increasing numbers of adult smallmouth bass compared to severely reduced numbers collected from 2005-2012. Decreased prevalence of disease in young-of-the-year smallmouth bass, along with the implementation of mandatory catch-and-release regulations enacted in 2011, have resulted in better recruitment of young bass to the adult populations.
However, bacterial infections causing sores and lesions continue to be observed in young-of-the-year smallmouth bass, prompting a renewed call by PFBC Executive Director John Arway to list the river as impaired. Other abnormal effects such as melanistic black spots and intersex conditions in adult bass, along with unprecedented nuisance algae blooms continue to plague the smallmouth fishery.
“Although we are cautiously optimistic about the population numbers we have observed over the last four years, our sampling is still finding young-of-the-year smallmouth bass displaying clinical signs of disease,” Arway said. “We continue to urge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to list the river as impaired in its final review of the 2016 Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report submitted by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).”
The DEP submits an updated report every two years to EPA Region 3 for approval. Adding the Susquehanna to the list as a “high priority” impaired water would trigger a two-year timeline requiring DEP to develop a comprehensive plan to identify the causes and sources of pollution and put a plan together to clean up the river consistent with the goals of the federal Clean Water Act.
DEP recommended against listing the river as impaired in the 2012, 2014 and 2016 reports. EPA is expected to review the 2016 report and issue a ruling by early next year, either accepting the report or requiring changes. Recently, EPA Region 3 exercised its authority and added 28 stream and river segments to West Virginia’s impaired waters list.
Last year, DEP and the PFBC released findings from a multi-year study (CADDIS) indicating that the most likely causes for the population decline of smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River are endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides; and pathogens and parasites.
Arway says the next step should be to focus on identifying the sources of the endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides, which would be required with an impairment designation.
“The Susquehanna River’s smallmouth bass fishery once attracted anglers from all over the world,” he said. “I am confident that the results from last year’s study, along with a continued commitment by DEP to identify the causes and reduce the sources of pollution, will provide for the eventual recovery and return of that once world class recreational fishery.”
“The impairment designation is critical to this effort,” he added. “Our concerns continue to be driven by the need to conserve and protect our aquatic resources so they may be enjoyed by present and future generations as guaranteed by our state constitution.”
Click here to see the Susquehanna River survey results.

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March 30th: Trout Season Begins in 18 Counties in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhyn...

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 19)Anglers from 18 southeastern counties are gearing up for the March 30 opening of trout, which marks the unofficial start of the 2013 fishing season.
“The buildup to opening day is just as exciting as the day itself,” said John Arway, executive director of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). “Anglers are busy cleaning their gear, stocking up on supplies and hopefully buying a few new rods and reels. And stocking schedules are posted to the Commission’s website, so the last step for anglers is to pick the spots they want to fish that day.”
“I’ll be at Opossum Lake in Cumberland County to celebrate the reopening of the lake, and encourage the public to join us and try their hand at catching some of the rainbow trout we’re stocking there,” he added.
The 18 counties open March 30 include: Adams, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, and York.
April 13 is the traditional opening day for the rest of the state.
Visit the PFBC’s website to see detailed stocking schedules, which can be easily sorted by county. The schedule shows what waters will be stocked, the date and time, and a meeting place where volunteers can gather to help with the stocking.
“While opening day is one of the biggest fishing days of the year, it’s also one of the biggest social events,” Arway added. “Research shows that when it comes to fishing, anglers like being together with friends and family just as much as they like catching fish.”
The PFBC’s “great white fleet” of stocking trucks has been busy since mid-February replenishing Pennsylvania’s waterways with a fresh supply of brook, brown and rainbow trout. Every year the PFBC stocks about 3.2 million trout in waterways across the state.
More than 850,000 anglers buy a fishing license each year.
For the first time this year, anglers can purchase multi-year fishing licenses, including a resident three-year license for $64.70 or a resident five-year license for $106.70. Resident three-year and five-year trout permits cost $25.70 and $41.70.
A one-year resident fishing license costs $22.70 and a trout-salmon permit is $9.70. A license is required for anyone 16 and older. Licenses can be purchased at sporting goods stores and online at www.fishandboat.com.
Also, a media resources page contains web banners, high resolution photos and radio public service announcements for graphic artists and reporters to use.
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Mentored Youth Trout Day Begins March 23 in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Rainbow trout

English: Rainbow trout (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 18) — Young anglers and their adult mentors can get an early start to trout season by fishing one of 12 waters on March 23, the weekend before the regional opening day.
The 12 waters identified by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) are part of the Mentored Youth Trout Day, a new pilot project being launched within the 18-county southeast area that makes up the regional opening day.
During the day on these waters, kids under the age of 16 must register with the PFBC before joining a mentor angler, who must have a current fishing license and trout permit. They will then be able to fish on the Saturday before the southeast opener on the select waters from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Each person will be permitted to keep a combined species total of two fish, and the fish must be at least 7 inches in length. Other Commonwealth inland regulations apply on this day. It is unlawful to fish in waters designated under the Mentored Youth Trout Day without a valid fishing license or without being accompanied by a registered youth.
In partnership with Cabela’s, the PFBC is hosting a tagged-fish contest at all 12 waters during the Mentored Youth Day on March 23. Each tagged fish caught represents a prize package of a $20 Cabela’s gift card with a Zebco rod and reel special-edition set. All tags obtained during the day will need to be redeemed by mail using the PFBC’s tag redemption form. Only qualified individuals in the Mentored Youth Trout Day are eligible to participate. All tags to be redeemed must be mailed and postmarked by March 27.
The 12 Mentored Youth Trout Day waters include (by county):
Adams – Waynesboro Reservoir
Berks – Antietam Lake
Berks – Scotts Run Lake
Bucks – Levittown Lake
Cumberland – Children’s Lake
Cumberland – Doubling Gap Lake
Dauphin – Middletown Reservoir
Lancaster – Muddy Run Recreational Lake
Lebanon – Lions Lake
Lehigh – Lehigh Canal, Section 8
Montgomery – Deep Creek Dam/Green Lake
Schuylkill – Locust Lake
Registration will be accepted during March 23 at all sites, and on-line registration is available at: http://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouth.htm.
For Mentored Youth Trout Day contest rules, tag redemption forms and details, visithttp://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouthContest.htm.
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Fishing Regulations Lifted on Meadow Grounds Lake in PA.

Fishing Pond in Fulton County, PA

Fishing Pond in Fulton County, PA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 5) – The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) announced today that it has temporarily lifted all seasons, sizes and creel limits on Fulton County’s Meadow Grounds Lake in anticipation of the lake being fully drained within the next several months.
“We have chosen to temporarily lift the regulations in order to reduce the number of fish in the lake in anticipation of a fish salvage prior to a complete drawdown of the lake,” said Dave Miko, chief of the PFBC Division of Fisheries Management. “We want anglers to fish the water and make good use of as many fish as they can.”
The temporary regulations take effect immediately and will remain in place until further notice by the PFBC.
The PFBC announced on Feb. 25 that it would drain the lake because of deficiencies in the lake’s dam. During an inspection in December, the PFBC and the state Department of Environmental Protection found that existing seepage in the dam had become more severe.
“The condition of the dam’s structural integrity necessitates that a complete drawdown of the lake be performed so that further testing and analyses can be conducted,” said Andy Shiels, PFBC Deputy Director of Operations.
The drawdown began yesterday and is expected to take up to three months to complete. The lake will be drained at a rate of about two feet per week, depending on weather.
The lake will be drawn down indefinitely until funding can be identified and secured to make the necessary repairs. At this point, the PFBC does not have the money to make the repairs at this facility.
PFBC biologists are currently developing a fish salvage plan to remove and relocate as many fish as possible. Although fish salvages generally save a large number of fish, a significant amount will also perish.
“We will collect as many fish as we can through netting and electro-fishing, but it is impossible to capture all of them,” Miko said. “Fish die during any drawdown and salvage effort. Many hide around structures where we simply can’t reach them, and others become buried in the mud when they are slow to exit the lake with the remaining water. Anglers and the general public should expect to see this.”
The lake will remain open to public use until the water level reaches a point where it may be unsafe for anglers. At that point the lake will be closed and signs will be posting alerting anglers of the closing.
The 204-acre lake is located on State Game Lands 53 in Ayr Township, Fulton County. The dam and lake areas are leased to the PFBC by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.
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100 Days of Summer: 100 Recreational Areas Within 100 Miles

Within 25 Miles

Within 50 Miles

Within 75 miles

Within 100 Miles

How To Use this List:

  • I’ve kept State Parks and related State Forests as two lines. This might be cheating, but they usually offer different experiences.
  • Each Link goes directly to the appropriate site, not to a directory, wherever possible.
  • Scroll down to your favorite area. Look right above it. Have you been here? How about the area right below it?

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Cabela’s “Wanna Go Fishing for Million$” Partner’s with PA Fish and Boat

Cabela's 50 Years 50 Trucks Sweepstakes

Harrisburg, PA – Get out your shiny lures and round up your fishing gear. Cabela’s and supporting sponsors announced today Wanna Go Fishing for Millions?, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to win millions of dollars in cash and prizes by enjoying one of America’s favorite pastimes – fishing.

Cabela’s is tagging hundreds of fish in selected waters in states that have Cabela’s retail stores – including Pennsylvania – and every one of them is a winner. Among the winning fish, there are grand prize winners that may qualify for additional bonuses based on the winning angler using or wearing sponsors’ products when they catch a tagged fish.

The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) is Cabela’s state partner and will tag fish in selected waters, which will be publicly announced on May 14, the official start of the contest. The contest runs through July 14.

PFBC Executive Director John Arway said the timing of the contest is perfect because it will coincide with the PFBC’s Fish-for-Free Day on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, giving vacationing families more incentive to try fishing.

“The contest creates a fantastic opportunity to promote all the fishing opportunities we have in Pennsylvania to first-time anglers on our Fish-for-Free Day,” he said. “On this day, we will hold special events at many of the selected contest waters. We will have exhibits, fishing instruction and tips, free publications and more.”

“The contest – and in particular the Fish-for-Free Day – promises to be fun and exciting for all levels of anglers,” Arway added. “Now when someone is fishing and feels that tug on their line, they will be thinking ‘Am I reeling in a million dollar prize?’”

Fish-for-Free Days allow anyone (resident or non-resident) to legally fish. No fishing license is required to fish on these days. All other fishing regulations apply. The second Fish-for-Free Day is Labor Day, Sept. 5.

Winning is as easy as baiting a hook. Go to the PFBC’s website for contest and Fish-for-Free information at: http://fishandboat.com/fishformillions.htm. Anglers need to pre-register and hit their local waters between May 14 and July 14 for their chance at winning a fish worth $2.2 million.

The mission of the Fish and Boat Commission is to protect, conserve, and enhance the Commonwealth’s aquatic resources and provide fishing and boating opportunities. For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website at www.fishandboat.com.

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Linesville Hatchery Open House April 2nd

The Pymatuning Reservoir, a man made lake in O...

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Meadville, PA – The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission will hold its annual Open House at the Linesville State Fish Hatchery on Saturday, April 2, from 11a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
What to do and see:
  • Watch the walleye spawning process including fish sorting, removing/fertilizing eggs.
  • See native fish species in the 10,000 gallon viewing tank.
  • Learn how to: tell the age of fish; tie knots; tie flies and cast; rig a rod; fillet/cook fish.
  • Buy a $3 t-shirt and put a fish print on it.
  • Buy your PA fishing license, posters, patches, and books.
  • Practice your casting skills in the Kids Casting Area.
  • Visit the boating safety tent to stay current on boating regulations.
  • Talk to staff from the PFBC and other partner agencies at their booths.
Shuttle service from the parking areas to the Visitor Center will be provided.
There’s something for everyone, so follow the crowd to the hatchery.
Directions:Turn off of State Route 6 at the only light in downtown Linesville and go ½ mile to the entrance. The address is 13300 Hartstown Road, Linesville, PA 16424.
The mission of the Fish and Boat Commission is to protect, conserve, and enhance the Commonwealth’s aquatic resources and provide fishing and boating opportunities.  For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website at www.fishandboat.com.

Meadville, PA – The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission will hold its annual Open House at the Linesville State Fish Hatchery on Saturday, April 2, from 11a.m. – 3:30 p.m. What to do and see:Watch the walleye spawning process including fish sorting, removing/fertilizing eggs.See native fish species in the 10,000 gallon viewing tank.Learn how to: tell the age of fish; tie knots; tie flies and cast; rig a rod; fillet/cook fish.Buy a $3 t-shirt and put a fish print on it.Buy your PA fishing license, posters, patches, and books.Practice your casting skills in the Kids Casting Area.Visit the boating safety tent to stay current on boating regulations.Talk to staff from the PFBC and other partner agencies at their booths.Shuttle service from the parking areas to the Visitor Center will be provided. There’s something for everyone, so follow the crowd to the hatchery. Directions:Turn off of State Route 6 at the only light in downtown Linesville and go ½ mile to the entrance. The address is 13300 Hartstown Road, Linesville, PA 16424. The mission of the Fish and Boat Commission is to protect, conserve, and enhance the Commonwealth’s aquatic resources and provide fishing and boating opportunities.  For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website at www.fishandboat.com.

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PA Fish and Boat's New Media Resource Page, Trout Stocking Schedule

Rainbow trout

Image via Wikipedia

Harrisburg, PA – With the opening days of trout season just around the corner, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission has created a new media resources web page containing web banners and high resolution photos for graphic artists and reporters to use.

The page – http://www.fishandboat.com/media-resources/trout-opener.htm – provides various sizes of web banners which can be placed easily on web pages to highlight the state’s two opening days. Stock photos are also available for media use, either in stories or as additional images on websites.

April 2 marks opening day for 18 southeastern counties. April 16 is the regular opening day for trout statewide.

For stocking schedules in your area visit: http://pfbc.state.pa.us/pfbc_webgis/TroutStockingDetails.aspx.

For more information on how you can help with a stocking, please visit:http://www.fishandboat.com/stock_help.htm.

The mission of the Fish and Boat Commission is to protect, conserve, and enhance the Commonwealth’s aquatic resources and provide fishing and boating opportunities.  For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website atwww.fishandboat.com.

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Black and Gold Play-Off Hot Buttered Rum Recipe

Fans of the Pittsburgh Steelers display their ...
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For the last couple years it’s been a tradition at Christmas to make Hot buttered Rum. This year, we discovered the inky goodness that is Kraken Black Spiced Rum. We’ve refined the recipe and just realized that now’s the perfect time to release the Steelers Black and Gold Hot Buttered Rum recipe to warm you for the PLayoff game and Superbowl:

Batter:

  • 2 Sticks Butter
  • 2 cups Brown Sugar
  • 1 pt. Golden Vanilla Ice Cream
  • Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
  • Teaspoon Nutmeg

Melt butter in a saucepan. Add brown sugar and dissoolve. remove from heat. Add Ice Cream, cinnamon and nutmeg. Stir until blended. Pur batter into a freezer bag and re-freeze.

To make Black and Gold Hot Buttered Rum:

Take a mug- Pour a shot of Kraken Black spiced rum, add a dollop of Gold batter and fill mug with boiling water. Enjoy

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Pennsylvania Deer Gun Hunting Season

A hunter posing with his 10-point deer. This i...
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HARRISBURG – Pennsylvania’s only unofficial holiday – the Monday after Thanksgiving, which marks the opening day of the two-week general deer season – will feature nearly 750,000 individuals sporting fluorescent orange and camouflage clothing throughout Penn’s Woods, according to Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe.
“Pennsylvania’s deer season has a dramatic and beneficial effect on the Commonwealth, as it provides hunters a chance to put venison in the freezer and stimulates a multi-million dollar economic surge that local businesses rely on,” Roe said. “In addition to being a rich part of our state’s heritage, deer season also is the most important method that the Game Commission has to manage Pennsylvania’s whitetails. The efforts of hunters are far-reaching, and they help to keep deer populations in check and enable the agency to meet deer management goals that benefit almost everyone who resides, visits or travels through this state.”
Roe noted that hunters will need to make sure that they have done their pre-season scouting, as fall food conditions will impact deer movements.
“Deer will respond to food availability and hunter pressure, both of which can vary from year to year, and from one area to another,” Roe said. “Our fall food survey suggests wildlife food abundance is quite variable this year.  Some areas have good acorn crops; others have few or no acorns.  So, as always, pre-season scouting can improve a hunter’s chance for success this year, particularly in the week leading up to the start of season.”
Deer season will open with a five-day, antlered deer-only season in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 2C, 2D, 2E, 2G, 3C, 4B, 4D and 4E from Nov. 29-Dec. 3. It is followed immediately in these WMUs by seven days of concurrent, antlered and antlerless deer hunting beginning Dec. 4, and continuing through Dec. 11. The rest of the state follows the two-week concurrent, antlered and antlerless season – Nov. 29-Dec. 11 – that has been in place since 2001.
Hunters must wear 250 square inches of fluorescent orange material on the head, chest and back combined at all times while afield during the seasons. They also are advised that it’s illegal to hunt, chase or disturb deer within 150 yards of any occupied building without the occupant’s permission if they are using a firearm, or 50 yards if they are using a bow or crossbow.
During the two-week season, hunters may use any legal sporting arm, as outlined on page 45 of the 2010-11 Digest.  Rifles are not permitted to be used in Allegheny, Bucks, Chester, Delaware or Montgomery counties.  Deer hunters in Philadelphia may only use bows or crossbows.
All hunters who take a deer must fill out their harvest tag and attach it to the deer’s ear before moving the carcass. The tag can be secured to the base of the ear with a string drawn very tightly, if the hunter plans to have the deer mounted. Cutting a slit in the ear to attach the tag will require additional work by a taxidermist.
Roe noted that there is no concurrent bear season during any portion of this year’s deer season.

GAME COMMISSION POSTS FIELD FORECASTS ON WEBSITE
Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officers (WCOs), Land Management Group Supervisors (LMGSs) and foresters spend a considerable amount of time gathering information about wildlife population trends in their districts.  With the hunting and trapping seasons in full swing, the Game Commission, once again, is sharing that information – through its website – with those who enjoy Penn’s Woods.
To view these field forecasts offered by Game Commission officers, go to the agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) and click on the “Field Officer Forecasts” photo link in the middle of the homepage, then select the region of interest in the map, and choose the WCO district of interest from the map.  For LMGS or forester reports, select the link to the LMGS Group or forester link of interest within that region.
“Our field officers and foresters provide wildlife forecasts for small game, furbearers, wild turkey, bear and deer within their respective districts,” said Carl G. Roe, Game Commission executive director.  “These forecasts are based on sightings field officers have had in the months leading up to the 2010-11 seasons, and some offer comparisons to previous wildlife forecasts. Some WCOs and LMGSs include anecdotal information, as well as hunting and trapping leads in their districts.
“The Game Commission offers this information to hunters and trappers to help them in their pursuits afield. Many WCO, LMGS and forester reports offer information on where to hunt or trap, as well as guidance on where to get more information, particularly for trapping certain furbearers, such as beaver and coyotes.”
Roe noted the Game Commission divides the state’s 67 counties into six regions, and then each region is divided into WCO districts comprised of about 300 square miles each.  There are 136 WCO districts statewide.  Each of the 29 LMGS groups is comprised of several counties or portions of counties within each region, and seeks to equally distribute the amount of State Game Lands and public access lands within the region.  The number of foresters ranges per region, from four to nine.

ONLINE HARVEST REPORTING AVAILABLE FOR DEER HARVESTS
Those participating in this year’s deer seasons will be able to file their harvest reports through the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s online system.
To report a deer harvest online, go to the Game Commission’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), click on “Report Your Harvest” above the “Quick Clicks” box in the right-hand column, check “Harvest Reporting,” scroll down and click on the “Start Here” button at the bottom of the page, choose the method of validating license information, and click on the checkbox for the harvest tag being reported.  A series of options will appear for a hunter to report a harvest. After filling in the harvest information, click on the “Continue” button to review the report and then hit the “Submit” button to complete the report. Failing to hit the “Submit” button will result in a harvest report not being completed.
“Hunters may report one or more harvests in a single session,” Roe said. “Responses to all harvest questions are required.”
Roe noted that hunters still have the option to file harvest report postcards, which are included as tear-out sheets in the current digest.
Tips on tagging and reporting deer also are available on the Game Commission’s white-tailed deer section. This information can be accessed by going to the agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), clicking on the “White-Tailed Deer” icon in the center of the homepage and then selecting “Tagging and Reporting Your Deer” in the “Deer Hunting” section.
“We certainly are encouraging hunters to use the online reporting system, which will ensure that their harvest is recorded,” Roe said.  “Either way, the more important point is that all hunters who harvest a deer report it to the agency.”

HUNTERS REMINDED THAT LICENSES STILL MUST BE DISPLAYED
Hunters and trappers are reminded that they still are required to display their licenses on an outer garment, said Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe.
“The Game Commission is supporting legislation to remove the statutory requirement that licenses be displayed, and thereby allow hunters to place their hunting license in their wallet with other ID,” Roe said. “However, until such time as the General Assembly removes this statutory requirement, hunters and trappers will need to continue to display their licenses.”

HUNTERS CAN CHECK ON TRAFFIC AND ROAD CONDITIONS IN ADVANCE
Hunters can check traffic and road conditions on more than 2,900 miles of roadways by simply calling 511 or logging onto the Department of Transportation’s website (www.511pa.com) before heading out to deer camp this year.
“’511PA’ is Pennsylvania’s official travel information service,” said Carl G. Roe, Game Commission executive director. “This service from PennDOT provides travelers with reliable, current traffic and weather information. This site enables hunters to check on the status of road conditions before heading out for camp.”

HUNTERS SHARING THE HARVEST A WORTHY CAUSE
Hunters who are successful in the upcoming deer hunting seasons are encouraged by the Pennsylvania Game Commission to consider participating in the state’s Hunters Sharing the Harvest (HSH) program, which channels donations of venison to local food banks, soup kitchens and needy families.  Pennsylvania’s HSH program is recognized as one of the most successful among similar programs in about 40 states.
“Using a network of local volunteer area coordinators and cooperating meat processors to process and distribute venison donated by hunters, HSH has really helped to make a difference for countless needy families and individuals in our state,” said Carl G. Roe, Game Commission executive director. “Pennsylvanians who participate in this extremely beneficial program should be proud of the role they play. HSH truly does make a tremendous difference.”
Started in 1991, HSH has developed into a refined support service for organizations that assist the Commonwealth’s needy.  Each year, Hunters Sharing the Harvest helps to deliver almost 200,000 meals to food banks, churches and social services feeding programs for meals provided to needy Pennsylvanians.
“This program is all about the generosity of hunters and their desire to help make a difference,” Roe said. “It’s a program that many hunters have become committed to and enjoy supporting. After all, what is more gratifying than providing needed food to families?”
As part of the program, hunters are encouraged to take a deer to a participating meat processor and identify how much of their deer meat – from an entire deer to several pounds – that is to be donated to HSH.  If the hunter is donating an entire deer, they are asked to make a $15 tax-deductible co-pay, and HSH will cover the remaining processing fees.  However, a hunter can cover the entire costs of the processing, which is tax deductible as well.
HSH established a statewide toll-free telephone number – 866-474-2141 – which also can answer hunters’ questions about where participating meat processors can be found or other general inquiries about the program.
To learn more about the program and obtain a list of participating meat processors and county coordinators, visit the Game Commission’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) and click on “Hunters Sharing the Harvest” in the “Quick Clicks” box in the right-hand column of the homepage, or go to the HSH website (www.sharedeer.org).

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