Category: Hunting

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Ohio Duck Blind Lottery August 20th, 2011

Sunset over Grand Lake St Marys in Ohio

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COLUMBUS, OH – More than 290 permits are available to hunters wishing to hunt ducks and geese from a blind at an Ohio State Park lake this waterfowl hunting season. A lottery drawing for the permits will be held at 17 state parks and two wildlife areas the morning of Saturday, August 20.

Interested applicants must appear in person at a participating state park office with proof of a 2011 Ohio hunting license, state wetlands stamp endorsement in the applicant’s name, and a signed 2011 or 2010 federal duck stamp. Applicants under the age of 18 are encouraged to have a parent or legal guardian present to sign the permit contract, and must provide the required license and stamps.

Participating state parks include Portage Lakes and West Branch in northeast Ohio; East Harbor, Indian Lake and Lake Loramie in northwest Ohio; Adams Lake, Buck Creek, Caesar Creek, Cowan Lake, East Fork, Hueston Woods, and Rocky Fork in southwest Ohio; and Alum Creek, A.W. Marion, Buckeye Lake, Deer Creek, and Delaware in central Ohio.

Applications will be taken beginning at 7:30 a.m. at most parks, with the lottery drawings at 8 a.m. at the park office, unless otherwise noted in the listing below.

Each hunter can apply for only one duck blind permit and no one can apply or draw for another person. There is a $50 non-refundable permit fee for the state park lottery winners.  Most locations accept cash, checks or credit cards for payment, except for Portage Lakes where payment is by cash (exact change) or check only.  Lottery winners have 45 days to construct their blinds and all blinds must be dismantled by March 15, 2012.

Hunters wishing to participate in the lotteries at Delaware or Indian Lake state parks are advised that the nearby Delaware marina, and the Indian Lake park office and commissary no longer sell hunting licenses and duck stamps. Hunters should purchase their license and stamp from another vendor prior to the lotteries.

Waterfowl hunting opportunities are also available through lottery drawings for blinds at the Mercer Wildlife Area on Grand Lake St. Marys, and the Mosquito Creek Wildlife Area adjacent to Mosquito Lake State Park. The drawings will be held at the respective wildlife area offices on August 20. There is no fee for use of the blinds at these areas. Lottery participants must also have a current Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification.

Information on waterfowl hunting seasons, locations and restrictions will be discussed by park staff and wildlife officers during the lotteries. For general information about hunting seasons and regulations, call 1-800-WILDLIFE or visit wildohio.com online.

The ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at ohiodnr.com

 

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Lottery for 9 Special Deer Hunts in Ohio

The Tiffin River viewed from Goll Woods State ...

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COLUMBUS, OH – In a continuing effort to protect native plant communities from the increasing population of white tailed deer, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Natural Areas and Preserves has scheduled special archery deer hunts at nine state nature preserves across the state.

Permits for the archery hunts will be awarded by lottery drawings held at the respective nature preserves in September. Hunters must appear in person for the lottery drawings, which is a change in procedure for the annual hunts.  Hunters must purchase tickets for the lotteries immediately prior to the drawings. The tickets are $5 each, and there is a limit of five tickets per person.

Each lottery winner will be assigned a two week block of time to hunt during the statewide archery season. They will receive a special archery hunt permit good for two hunters for the assigned two week period. After the drawings, hunters will be advised of special regulations that apply during the hunts, which have been designated as “doe first,” requiring that each hunter harvest an anterless deer before taking a buck.

Participating nature preserves in central Ohio include Seymour Woods in Delaware County; southeast Ohio preserves include Christmas Rocks and Shallenberger in Fairfield County; southwest Ohio preserves include Culberson Woods in Clinton County and Halls Creek Gorge in Warren County; northwest Ohio preserves include Goll Woods in Fulton County and Lawrence Woods in Hardin County; and northeast Ohio preserves include Springville Marsh and Collier Woods in Seneca County.

“High quality habitats at these preserves have been negatively impacted, and plants such as large flowered trillium have nearly disappeared from many sites because of foraging deer,” said Randy Beinlich, Preserve Manager for the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves. “Not only do these hunts allow Ohio’s hunters to assist us with our land management activities, but it also gives them the chance to see and appreciate some of Ohio’s highest quality areas.”

All Ohio hunting rules and regulations will be followed during the special archery hunts, including bag limits and tagging procedures. Hunters may apply for multiple sites, but must attend the meeting for each hunt in order to enter the drawing. Entry fees may be paid by check, only. Processing fees are not refundable.

Hunt locations and meeting dates are as follows:

Seymour Woods (Delaware County)
Meeting Date:                September 17 @ 10AM
Meeting location:          Alum Creek State Park Office
3615 South Old State Road,  Delaware,  Ohio 45015
Manager Contact:         Greg Seymour – 740-467-2690

Culberson Woods (Clinton County)
Halls Creek Gorge (Warren Coutny)
Meeting Date:                September 10 @ 9AM
Meeting Location:         Cowen Lake State Park Office
1750 Osborn Road,  Wilmington, Ohio 45177
Manager Contact:          Shannon Hoffer  –  937-382-1096

Christmas Rocks (Fairfield County)
Shallenberger (Fairfield County)
Meeting Date:                 September 10 @ 2 PM
Meeting Location:          Stages Pond State Nature Preservce
4792 Hagerty Road,  Ashville, OH 43103
Manager Contact:          Jeff Johnson – 740-380-8919

Goll Woods (Fulton County)
Meeting Date:                  September 9 @ 5PM
Meeting Location:           Goll Woods State Nature Preserve Office
26093 County Road F,  Archbold, Ohio  43502
Manager Contact:           Ryan Schroeder – 419-445-1775

Lawrence Woods (Hardin County)
Meeting Date:                 September 11 @ 1PM
Meeting Location:          Lawrence Woods State Nature Preserve parking area
13278 County Road 190,  Kenton, Ohio,  43226
Manager Contact:          Ryan Schroeder – 419-445-1775

Springville Marsh (Seneca County)
Meeting Date:                 September 16 @ 2PM
Meeting Location:          Springville Marsh State Nature Preserve parking area
Twp Road 24 (Muck Road) 1 mile west of US RT 23
3.5 miles north of Carey
Manager Contact:          Ryan Schroeder – 419-445-1775

Collier Woods (Seneca County)
Meeting Date:                 September 16 @ 5PM
Meeting Location:          Howard Collier State Nature Preserve
1655 W TWP RD 38, Tiffin Ohio,  44883
Manager Contact:          Ryan Schroeder – 419-445-1775

The ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at ohiodnr.com

 

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100 Days of Summer: 100 Recreational Areas Within 100 Miles

Within 25 Miles

Within 50 Miles

Within 75 miles

Within 100 Miles

How To Use this List:

  • I’ve kept State Parks and related State Forests as two lines. This might be cheating, but they usually offer different experiences.
  • Each Link goes directly to the appropriate site, not to a directory, wherever possible.
  • Scroll down to your favorite area. Look right above it. Have you been here? How about the area right below it?

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Gun Digest 2011 : Buy on Amazon Kindle and Take it Anywhere

The Gun Digest 2011
is now available for the Kindle.  Here’s an Excerpt on Teddy Roosevelt’s African Safari hunting rifles:


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Ohio Spring Turkey Season Underway

Kalkoen Turkey

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COLUMBUS, OH – Ohio hunters harvested a preliminary total of 2,646 bearded wild turkeys on the first day of the spring turkey-hunting season, which is open statewide through May 15, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

Top counties for wild turkeys killed on Monday were: Guernsey – 94; Adams – 88; Tuscarawas – 85; Muskingum – 81; Coshocton and Knox – 79; Belmont – 73; Washington – 72; Brown – 71; and Ashtabula – 70.

The Division of Wildlife estimates that more than 70,000 people will hunt turkeys during the four-week season. Legal hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise until noon from April 18 to May 1, 2011. Hunting hours May 2-15 will be a half hour before sunrise to sunset. Ohio’s wild turkey population was estimated at 200,000 prior to the start of the spring season.

A special youth-only hunt for hunters age 17 and younger was held statewide on Saturday and Sunday, April 16-17. Young hunters killed 1,455 birds statewide. Top reporting counties were: Ashtabula – 49; Brown and Tuscarawas – 47; Highland – 46; Licking – 45; Muskingum – 44; Carroll – 42; Jackson – 40; and Adams and Washington – 38.

Only bearded wild turkeys may be taken during the spring hunting season. A hunter is required to check in their turkey by 11 p.m. on the day of harvest. Hunters with the proper permits may take a limit of two bearded gobblers during the four-week season, but not more than one wild turkey per day.

Hunters must still report their turkey harvest, but they are no longer required to take their turkey to a check station for physical inspection. Instead, hunters have three options to complete the new automated game check:

On the Internet at wildohio.com or ohiogamecheck.com
By telephone at 1-877-TAG-ITOH (1-877-824-4864). This option is only available to those who are required to have a turkey permit to hunt turkeys.
At all license agents. A list of these agents can be found at wildohio.com
Game-check transactions will be available online and by telephone seven days a week and during holidays. License agents’ locations will be available for turkey check-in during normal business hours. Please call the license agent for specific hours of operation. All turkeys must be checked in by 11 p.m. the day of kill.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

EDITORS NOTE – Below is a list of preliminary wild turkey harvest results for the 2011 spring season opening day:

Adams – 88; Allen – 7; Ashland – 24; Ashtabula – 70; Athens – 69; Auglaize – 4; Belmont – 73; Brown – 71; Butler – 30; Carroll – 41; Champaign – 14; Clark – 4; Clermont – 54; Clinton – 9; Columbiana – 56; Coshocton – 79; Crawford – 15; Cuyahoga – 1; Darke – 3; Defiance – 19; Delaware – 20; Erie – 8; Fairfield – 21; Fayette – 0; Franklin – 4; Fulton – 9; Gallia – 64; Geauga – 42; Greene – 6; Guernsey – 94; Hamilton – 30; Hancock – 5; Hardin – 8; Harrison – 67; Henry – 4; Highland – 59; Hocking – 44; Holmes – 30; Huron – 31; Jackson – 43; Jefferson – 62; Knox – 79; Lake – 11; Lawrence – 29; Licking – 67; Logan – 24; Lorain – 15; Lucas – 3; Madison – 0; Mahoning – 24; Marion – 4; Medina – 11; Meigs – 69; Mercer – 3; Miami – 5; Monroe – 55; Montgomery – 1; Morgan – 54; Morrow – 31; Muskingum – 81; Noble – 31; Ottawa – 0; Paulding – 7; Perry – 38; Pickaway – 4; Pike – 46; Portage – 29; Preble – 10; Putnam – 3; Richland – 53; Ross – 58; Sandusky – 3; Scioto – 36; Seneca – 22; Shelby – 6; Stark – 27; Summit – 4; Trumbull – 47; Tuscarawas – 85; Union – 7; Van Wert – 3; Vinton – 33; Warren – 17; Washington – 72; Wayne – 15; Williams – 24; Wood – 4; Wyandot – 14. Total – 2,646.

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2011-2012 Ohio Hunting Seasons Approved

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COLUMBUS, OH – Hunting and trapping regulations for 2011-12 seasons were passed by the Ohio Wildlife Council at the April 6 meeting, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

The proposed change to move Fayette County from Deer Zone B to Zone A was approved.  A rule to eliminate the requirement for all packages of deer meat produced during the butchering process to be marked with the tag, seal or certificate number was also passed.  The tag, seal or certificate must be maintained until the entire deer has been consumed, but the package no longer needs to be marked.

Hunters can again buy antlerless deer permits at reduced prices for hunting in an urban zone, participating in a Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunt or hunting during the September 24 to November 27 portion of the deer season.  The sale of reduced priced antlerless permits will cease after November 27, so hunters need to commit early to buying and using the extra reduced-cost permits to take full advantage of this opportunity. The deadline for using the antlerless permit will be extended to December 4 for those hunting in Deer Zone C.  Cost of the antlerless deer permit remains $15.

Deer Limits

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone A is two.  Prior to November 28, hunters may take up to two deer in Zone A, one of which may be on a $15 antlerless deer permit.  Beginning November 28, hunters may take only one deer in Zone A and antlerless permits may not be used.

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone B is four.  Prior to November 28, hunters may take up to four deer in Zone B, two of which may be on $15 antlerless deer permits.  Beginning November 28, hunters may take only two deer in Zone B and antlerless permits may not be used.

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone C is six.  Prior to December 5, hunters may take up to six deer in Zone C, three of which may be on $15 antlerless deer permits.  Beginning December 5, hunters may take only three deer in Zone C and antlerless permits may not be used.

Those hunting in urban zones and at Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunts will again have a six-deer bag limit, and those deer will not count against the hunter’s zone bag limit.

Either a $15 antlerless deer permit and a valid hunting license or $24 deer permit and a valid hunting license are required to hunt deer in Ohio.  A hunter may take only one antlered deer in Ohio, regardless of zone, hunting method or season.

2011-12 White-tailed Deer Seasons and Dates

  • Archery season  September 24 through February 5, 2012
  • Special area muzzleloader hunts October 17-22
  • Youth deer-gun season  November 19-20
  • Statewide deer-gun season  November 28 through December 4 and December 17-18
  • Statewide muzzleloader season  January 7-10, 2012

During the 2010-2011 season hunters killed a total of 239,260 deer.  Approximately 475,000 people hunt white-tailed deer in Ohio.

Hunting seasons for rabbit, pheasant, quail, squirrel, crow, and wild turkey were approved as proposed.  So were trapping seasons for beaver, mink, muskrat, and river otter, along with the hunting and trapping seasons for beaver, fox, raccoon, skunk, and weasel.

2011-12 Hunting and/or Trapping Seasons and Dates

  • Squirrel  September 1 through January 31, 2012
  • Ruffed grouse – October 8 through January 31, 2012
  • Fall Wild Turkey – October 8 – November 27, in specified counties
  • Youth upland season – October 22-23 and October 29-30
  • Cottontail rabbit  November 4 through February 29, 2012
  • Ring-necked Pheasant November 4 through January 8, 2012
  • Bobwhite Quail – November 4-27, in specified counties
  • Fox, raccoon, skunk, opossum, and weasel – November 10 through January 31, 2012
  • Mink and muskrat  November 10 through February 29, 2012
  • Mink, muskrat, raccoon, skunk, opossum, and weasel (Lake Erie Marsh area)  November 10 through March 15, 2012
  • Beaver – December 26 through February 29, 2012
  • River Otter – December 26 through February 29, 2012
  • Youth Spring Wild Turkey Season – April 21 and 22, 2012
  • Spring Wild Turkey – April 23, 2012 through May 20, 2012
  • Crow (Fri, Sat, Sun only) – June 3, 2011 through March 12, 2012 and June 2, 2012 through March 11, 2013
  • Coyote and woodchuck – No closed season

Rules and season dates for migratory birds including mourning dove, Canada goose, rail, moorhen, snipe, woodcock, and waterfowl hunting will be set in August, in compliance with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service‘s 2011-12 framework.

All hunting and trapping season dates and rules can be found at wildohio.com.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all.  Visit the ODNR Web site atohiodnr.com.

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Ohio Spring Turkey Season Starts

Is a photo of a wild turkey

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OLUMBUS, OH – Spring wild turkey hunting opens in all 88 Ohio counties on Monday, April 18, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife. The season continues through Sunday, May 15.

“Hunters may see three-year-old gobblers this spring based on the strength of the 2008 hatch,” said ODNR Wildlife Biologist Mike Reynolds. “Overall, turkey numbers should be good across the state, but the harvest will likely not top last year’s kill — the second highest all-time.”

Hunters harvested 23,421 wild turkeys during last year’s youth and spring turkey seasons. Reynolds added that Ohio’s current wild turkey population is around 200,000. He anticipates as many as 70,000 licensed hunters, not counting private landowners hunting on their own property, will enjoy Ohio’s popular spring wild turkey season.

A special youth-only turkey hunt for those possessing a valid youth hunting license and youth turkey permit will be held on Saturday and Sunday, April 16-17. Young hunters must be accompanied by a non-hunting adult, 18 years of age or older. The young hunter’s turkey season is open statewide with the exception of Lake La Su An State Wildlife Area in Williams County which requires a special hunting permit. Legal hunting hours are a half-hour before sunrise to sunset each day during the two-day youth season.

All hunters must still report their harvest of turkeys, but they are no longer required to take their turkey to a check station for physical inspection. Hunters will have three options to complete the automated game check:

• On the Internet at www.wildohio.com or www.ohiogamecheck.com
• By telephone at 1-877-TAG-ITOH(1-877-824-4864). This option is only available to those who are required to purchase a turkey
permit to hunt turkeys.
• At all license agents

Game-check transactions will be available online and by telephone seven days a week and during holidays. Landowner hunters who are not required to purchase a spring turkey permit must use the Internet or any license agent to check their turkey. Hunters who tag their turkey as a landowner harvest cannot use the phone-in method. All authorized license sales agents will also check in your game. A list of these agents can be found at www.ohiodnr.com/wildlife/dow/regulations/vendor.aspx.

Legal hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise until noon from April 18 to May 1, 2011. Hunting hours from May 2-15 will be a half-hour before sunrise to sunset. Hunters are required to have a hunting license and a spring turkey-hunting permit and can take one bearded turkey per day. A second spring turkey permit can be purchased allowing hunters to take a limit of two bearded wild turkeys.

Shotguns using shot, longbows, and crossbows may be used to hunt wild turkeys. It is unlawful to hunt turkeys over bait, to use a live decoy or electronic calling device, or to shoot a wild turkey while it is in a tree.

The Division of Wildlife advises turkey hunters to wear hunter orange clothing when entering, leaving or moving through hunting areas in order to remain visible to others.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at ohiodnr.com.

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Cold Water Safety for Ohio Hunters and Anglers

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Official Emblem - S...

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COLUMBUS, OH– The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) has good advice for the thousands of anglers who soon will be wading in and boating upon frigid waterways in hopes of landing a prize catch—dress for the water temperature instead of air temperature.

“Recreational boaters and anglers are among those most at risk of sustaining hypothermia due to a cold water immersion if they are not dressed properly for the water temperature,” said Pamela Dillon, chief of the ODNR Division of Watercraft. “Boating and fishing safety begins with the choices people make before getting on the water; it is critical to take steps to reduce the risks of hypothermia exposure at this time of year.”

Hypothermia is a condition in which body temperature drops below normal due to exposure to cold temperatures and requires medical treatment. Unexpected immersion into cold water can result in drowning and often contributes to hypothermia for those persons who are unprepared for extremely cold water.

People are usually inclined to dress for the air temperature instead of water temperature when enjoying outdoors recreation on or near the water. Generally, the water temperatures of Ohio’s waterways remain bone chilling and are very slow to warm during March, April and early May.

The following are some safety tips to help reduce exposure to the risks of hypothermia while boating and fishing:

  • Dress for the current water temperature and not the air temperature when boating in early spring. Wear layers of protective clothing including neoprene, polypropylene, wool, synthetic fleece and Goretex. Avoid 100 percent cotton and denim garments, such as blue jeans, sweatshirts and flannel shirts. The final layer of protective clothing should always be a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket or vest.
  • Carry a cellphone inside a plastic bag in case an emergency should arise.
  • Avoid alcohol consumption to help prevent the onset of hypothermia symptoms.
  • Avoid capsizing and swamping by ensuring that boats are not overloaded, but are properly loaded and balanced before leaving the launch ramp or dock.
  • Properly and safely anchor a boat from the bow when using a single line.
  • File a float plan with a person of responsibility so that assistance may be requested if boaters are significantly overdue in their return from the water.

Additional information on boating safety tips and education programs may be found online at www.ohiodnr.com/watercraft or by following the Division of Watercraft on Facebookor Twitter. You may also call toll-free (in Ohio only) 1-877-4BOATER.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at ohiodnr.com

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104,000 Pounds of Venison Donated to the Hungry

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COLUMBUS, OH – Ohio deer hunters have donated more than 104,100 pounds of venison to local food banks so far this deer season, according to Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry (FHFH) and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

“I am happy to see this program continue to grow each year. Ohio hunters once again have shown their generosity so Ohio’s food pantries will receive the nutritious red meat they so desperately need,” said David M. Graham, chief of the Division of Wildlife.

The 104,100 pounds equals approximately 416,400 meals for needy Ohioans. To date, 2,082 deer have been donated with plenty of deer hunting opportunity left in the 2010-11 season. Last year at this time, 1,910 deer had been donated representing 95,500 pounds of venison.

Last year FHFH collected 116,750 pounds of venison from 2,336 deer through the entire season, which ran from September 2009 to February 7, 2010. Ohio county chapters with the highest numbers of deer donations so far are: Licking-208; Muskingum, Morgan and Perry-189; Coshocton, Tuscarawas, and Knox-160; Athens, Gallia, Hocking, Meigs, Vinton and Washington-137; and Franklin-121.

“We are thrilled that the partnership between FHFH and ODNR has resulted in greater numbers of donated deer – and meals provided – across Ohio again this year. With high unemployment in many areas fueling an even greater need for nutritious food items at food banks and feeding ministries, this growth could not have come at a better time, ” according to Josh Wilson, FHFH national operations director.

Hunters still have a weekend of deer-gun hunting, December 18-19, and eight weeks of archery hunting in Ohio. Archery season remains open until February 6. The statewide muzzleloader deer-hunting season will be held, January 8 – 11, 2011.

The Division of Wildlife collaborated with Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry in an effort to assist with the processing costs associated with donating venison to a food bank. So far, a $100,000 subsidy grant was provided in two $50,000 allotments that are to be matched with funds generated or collected by FHFH. The division subsidized this year’s FHFH operation as an additional deer management tool, helping wildlife managers encourage hunters to kill more does.

Venison that is donated to food banks must be processed by a federal, state or locally inspected and insured meat processor that is participating with FHFH. Hunters wishing to donate their deer to a food bank are not required to pay for the processing of the venison as long as the program has funds available to cover the cost. There are currently 71 participating meat processors across the state. A list is provided atwww.fhfh.org.

Currently there are 31 local chapters across the state with a need for more. Anyone interested in becoming a local program coordinator or a participating meat processor should visit the “Local FHFH” page atwww.fhfh.org. The Web page includes a current list of coordinators, program names and the counties they serve.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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Northeast Ohio Blows Away Those Turkeys

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COLUMBUS, OH- Ohio’s fall wild turkey season ended November 28 with 1,336 birds killed during the seven-week season. Ashtabula County led the state with 75 birds taken, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.  Last year, 2,180 birds were taken.

“The decline in the fall turkey harvest we observed from 2009 to 2010 was not unexpected. Acorn mast crop failures like we observed in 2009 typically result in increased hunter success and higher fall turkey harvests because turkeys feed in open areas, such as agricultural fields and pastures,” said Wildlife Biologist Mike Reynolds. “Bumper acorn crops like we’ve experienced in 2010 often lead to reduced hunting success and harvests because turkeys are feeding on acorns in the forest, and are often widely scattered and difficult for hunters to locate.”

The fall turkey season which ran October 9 through November 28, allowed hunters the choice of pursuing a bird with a shotgun, muzzleloading shotgun, bow or crossbow. Hunters had 48 counties in which to pursue a wild turkey of either sex.

Before the start of this fall’s hunting season, Ohio’s estimated wild turkey population was around 230,000. As many as 20,000 people, not counting private landowners hunting on their own property, enjoyed Ohio’s fall wild turkey season.

The top 10 counties for fall turkey harvest were: Ashtabula-75, Licking-57, Trumbull-56, Knox-55, Coshocton-54, Highland-52, Tuscarawas-49, Clermont-48, Ashland-46 and Geauga-45.

Hunters who wish to share their success can submit a photo of themselves and the turkey they killed this year to wildohio.com.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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