Category: Fishing

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PA Smallmouth Bass Populations Showing Improvement, But Caution Still Advised

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Dec. 8) – Following nearly a decade of poor recruitment due to disease affecting young-of-the-year, the smallmouth bass populations in the Susquehanna and lower Juniata rivers are showing signs of improvement, according to information released today by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC).

Surveys conducted from 2013-2016 reveal increasing numbers of adult smallmouth bass compared to severely reduced numbers collected from 2005-2012. Decreased prevalence of disease in young-of-the-year smallmouth bass, along with the implementation of mandatory catch-and-release regulations enacted in 2011, have resulted in better recruitment of young bass to the adult populations.
However, bacterial infections causing sores and lesions continue to be observed in young-of-the-year smallmouth bass, prompting a renewed call by PFBC Executive Director John Arway to list the river as impaired. Other abnormal effects such as melanistic black spots and intersex conditions in adult bass, along with unprecedented nuisance algae blooms continue to plague the smallmouth fishery.
“Although we are cautiously optimistic about the population numbers we have observed over the last four years, our sampling is still finding young-of-the-year smallmouth bass displaying clinical signs of disease,” Arway said. “We continue to urge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to list the river as impaired in its final review of the 2016 Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report submitted by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).”
The DEP submits an updated report every two years to EPA Region 3 for approval. Adding the Susquehanna to the list as a “high priority” impaired water would trigger a two-year timeline requiring DEP to develop a comprehensive plan to identify the causes and sources of pollution and put a plan together to clean up the river consistent with the goals of the federal Clean Water Act.
DEP recommended against listing the river as impaired in the 2012, 2014 and 2016 reports. EPA is expected to review the 2016 report and issue a ruling by early next year, either accepting the report or requiring changes. Recently, EPA Region 3 exercised its authority and added 28 stream and river segments to West Virginia’s impaired waters list.
Last year, DEP and the PFBC released findings from a multi-year study (CADDIS) indicating that the most likely causes for the population decline of smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River are endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides; and pathogens and parasites.
Arway says the next step should be to focus on identifying the sources of the endocrine-disrupting compounds and herbicides, which would be required with an impairment designation.
“The Susquehanna River’s smallmouth bass fishery once attracted anglers from all over the world,” he said. “I am confident that the results from last year’s study, along with a continued commitment by DEP to identify the causes and reduce the sources of pollution, will provide for the eventual recovery and return of that once world class recreational fishery.”
“The impairment designation is critical to this effort,” he added. “Our concerns continue to be driven by the need to conserve and protect our aquatic resources so they may be enjoyed by present and future generations as guaranteed by our state constitution.”
Click here to see the Susquehanna River survey results.

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Trout Fishing Opportunities Await Anglers at Castalia State Fish Hatchery

Annual Castalia Lottery Post

Applications may be submitted March 1-31

COLUMBUS, OH – Controlled trout-fishing opportunities on Cold Creek, one of Ohio’s unique streams, await fishing enthusiasts who enter a special lottery conducted by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR). A half-mile section of the creek, located at the ODNR Division of Wildlife’s Castalia State Fish Hatchery in Erie County, will be open to a limited number of anglers on selected dates from May 2–Nov. 30. Anglers interested in fishing the stream must submit an application form and a nonrefundable $3 application fee between March 1–31 for the random drawing. Applications may be completed online at wildohio.gov or by calling 800-WILDLIFE to obtain an application form. Only one application is allowed per person. Application information can be obtained from the ODNR Division of Wildlife at wildohio.gov or by calling 800-WILDLIFE.

The adult fishing season will run May 2–Nov. 30, and a youth season will run June 13–Aug. 12. Applicants of the youth lottery must be under the age of 16 when they apply.

Approximately 90 adult and 90 youth permits will be issued. Individuals selected to participate will be allowed to bring two adults and three youths under the age of 16 (no more than six people total). Participation is determined by a computer-generated random drawing, which will be held in early April. The results of the adult drawing will be posted on the division’s website at wildohio.gov. Successful youth applicants will be notified by mail of their fishing dates. Applicants not chosen will not be notified.

Special fishing rules will be in effect to ensure that a quality fishing experience is maintained throughout the season. One of these special rules prohibits catch-and-release fishing, with wildlife officials requiring that anglers keep all fish they catch. The daily bag limit will be five trout per angler.

Anglers will be required to check in at the hatchery upon arrival and check out at the end of their session. Fishing sessions will be open from 7 a.m.–12 p.m. for adult events. For the youth events, there will be two sessions per day, 7–11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. All anglers age 16 and older will need a valid 2016 Ohio fishing license.

An Ohio resident annual fishing license costs $19; a one-day fishing license costs $11. Those who purchase a one-day fishing license may later return it to a license agent to receive credit toward the purchase of an annual fishing license.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.


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Be Careful on the Ice

COLUMBUS, OH – Winter appears to have finally arrived for good in Ohio, and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) wants to encourage eager ice anglers to be cautious and aware of the conditions before ice fishing on Ohio waters. While Ohio offers an unparalleled fishing experience, it’s important to remember that no ice is safe ice, and any ice that is covered by snow should always be presumed to be unsafe.

Ice Fishing Safety Tips

  • Ice anglers should file a “float plan” to let people know when they will be out on the ice, where they will be fishing, where they will park their vehicles and when they will return home.
  • Always fish with a partner or in an area where several other anglers are present.
  • Contact a local ice guide or bait shop to ask about ice conditions.
  • Put a cellphone in a plastic bag to protect it from getting wet.
  • Adequately check the ice thickness before traveling onto the ice.
  • Dress properly for conditions, which should include wearing an approved life vest.

Staying Safe and Warm While Enjoying the Winter Weather

  • Dress warmly in layers. Start with insulating fabrics and use a final layer of protective fabrics.
  • Come prepared, be aware and know when to go indoors.
  • Keep your head, neck and hands covered, and wear waterproof boots.

Additionally, ice anglers should make sure they have a valid Ohio fishing license. Licenses expire on Feb. 29 so anglers should purchase a new license by March 1. Ice anglers should also know the size and daily limits for the fish they hope to catch.

For more information about dressing for the winter weather in Ohio, go to parks.ohiodnr.gov/winter. To learn more about ice fishing in Ohio, go to wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/fishing/ice-fishing.

ODNR also licenses fishing guides in the Lake Erie region. For people interested in going on an ice fishing trip with a guide, go to wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/fishing/ice-fishing/ohio-ice-fishing-guides.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

 


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2013 Walleye Migration Underway on Maumee and Sandusky Rivers

 

Daily bag limit is four walleye until April 30

COLUMBUS, OH – The annual appearance of migrating walleye in the Maumee and Sandusky rivers brings fantastic spring fishing opportunities,

according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

An annual phenomenon in northwest Ohio occurs each spring when a portion of Lake Erie’s walleye population moves up the Maumee and Sandusky rivers to spawn. Although the fish caught represent a small portion of all Lake Erie walleye, the run brings hundreds of thousands of fish within casting distance of eager shore anglers.

Sunset on Lake Erie seen through a fishing net.

Walleye spawning normally occurs in these rivers anytime from mid-March through mid-April, but the peak activity usually occurs the first week of April when the water temperatures range from 40 to 50 degrees. Moderately-high water also increases the number of walleye in the rivers, especially if river temperatures are warmer than lake temperatures.

The best fishing areas in the Maumee River are from Orleans Park in Perrysburg upstream to the end of Jerome Road in Lucas County. Sandusky River anglers will find better success from Brady’s Island to Rodger Young Park in the city of Fremont. Fishing is prohibited upstream from Rodger Young Park to the Ballville Dam.

Anglers are reminded the bag limit for Lake Erie and its tributaries is four walleye until April 30. Anglers are also reminded that there is a year-round 15-inch length limit for walleye on Lake Erie and its tributaries to the first dam or designated landmark. Anglers can see the latest on the walleye biteor review the 2013-2014 Ohio Fishing Regulations at wildohio.com.

Fishermen who are wading also need to ensure they are prepared to experience an unexpected cold water immersion and should consider wearing a flotation device as well as fish with a partner. Though most anglers wade in the rivers while walleye fishing, some choose to fish from boats. ODNR advises boat anglers to always properly wear life jackets, take precautions against overloading their boats and capsizing, be well dressed to avoid the onset of hypothermia and be prepared to handle any emergency. Boats should never be anchored off the stern.

Special regulations are in effect for Maumee and Sandusky river walleye fisheries during March and April. Fishing is only allowed between sunrise and sunset in specified areas, and treble hooks are prohibited. Anglers may only use a single hook that is no larger than 1 inch from shank to point. Only fish that are hooked inside the mouth may legally be taken, and any snagged fish must be immediately released.

The sales of fishing licenses, along with the Sport Fish Restoration (SFR) program, continue to fund ODNR Division of Wildlife fish management operations. No state tax dollars are used for these activities. These are user-pay, user-benefit programs.

The SFR is a partnership between federal and state government, industry and anglers/boaters. When anglers purchase rods, reels, fishing tackle, fish finders and motor boat fuel, they pay an excise tax. The federal government collects these taxes, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service administers and disburses these funds to state fish and wildlife agencies. These funds are used to acquire habitat, produce and stock fish, conduct research and surveys, provide aquatic education and acquire and develop boat accesses.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

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March 30th: Trout Season Begins in 18 Counties in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhyn...

English: Man holding a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 19)Anglers from 18 southeastern counties are gearing up for the March 30 opening of trout, which marks the unofficial start of the 2013 fishing season.
“The buildup to opening day is just as exciting as the day itself,” said John Arway, executive director of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC). “Anglers are busy cleaning their gear, stocking up on supplies and hopefully buying a few new rods and reels. And stocking schedules are posted to the Commission’s website, so the last step for anglers is to pick the spots they want to fish that day.”
“I’ll be at Opossum Lake in Cumberland County to celebrate the reopening of the lake, and encourage the public to join us and try their hand at catching some of the rainbow trout we’re stocking there,” he added.
The 18 counties open March 30 include: Adams, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Franklin, Juniata, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Schuylkill, and York.
April 13 is the traditional opening day for the rest of the state.
Visit the PFBC’s website to see detailed stocking schedules, which can be easily sorted by county. The schedule shows what waters will be stocked, the date and time, and a meeting place where volunteers can gather to help with the stocking.
“While opening day is one of the biggest fishing days of the year, it’s also one of the biggest social events,” Arway added. “Research shows that when it comes to fishing, anglers like being together with friends and family just as much as they like catching fish.”
The PFBC’s “great white fleet” of stocking trucks has been busy since mid-February replenishing Pennsylvania’s waterways with a fresh supply of brook, brown and rainbow trout. Every year the PFBC stocks about 3.2 million trout in waterways across the state.
More than 850,000 anglers buy a fishing license each year.
For the first time this year, anglers can purchase multi-year fishing licenses, including a resident three-year license for $64.70 or a resident five-year license for $106.70. Resident three-year and five-year trout permits cost $25.70 and $41.70.
A one-year resident fishing license costs $22.70 and a trout-salmon permit is $9.70. A license is required for anyone 16 and older. Licenses can be purchased at sporting goods stores and online at www.fishandboat.com.
Also, a media resources page contains web banners, high resolution photos and radio public service announcements for graphic artists and reporters to use.
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Mentored Youth Trout Day Begins March 23 in Southeastern Pennsylvania

English: Rainbow trout

English: Rainbow trout (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 18) — Young anglers and their adult mentors can get an early start to trout season by fishing one of 12 waters on March 23, the weekend before the regional opening day.
The 12 waters identified by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) are part of the Mentored Youth Trout Day, a new pilot project being launched within the 18-county southeast area that makes up the regional opening day.
During the day on these waters, kids under the age of 16 must register with the PFBC before joining a mentor angler, who must have a current fishing license and trout permit. They will then be able to fish on the Saturday before the southeast opener on the select waters from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Each person will be permitted to keep a combined species total of two fish, and the fish must be at least 7 inches in length. Other Commonwealth inland regulations apply on this day. It is unlawful to fish in waters designated under the Mentored Youth Trout Day without a valid fishing license or without being accompanied by a registered youth.
In partnership with Cabela’s, the PFBC is hosting a tagged-fish contest at all 12 waters during the Mentored Youth Day on March 23. Each tagged fish caught represents a prize package of a $20 Cabela’s gift card with a Zebco rod and reel special-edition set. All tags obtained during the day will need to be redeemed by mail using the PFBC’s tag redemption form. Only qualified individuals in the Mentored Youth Trout Day are eligible to participate. All tags to be redeemed must be mailed and postmarked by March 27.
The 12 Mentored Youth Trout Day waters include (by county):
Adams – Waynesboro Reservoir
Berks – Antietam Lake
Berks – Scotts Run Lake
Bucks – Levittown Lake
Cumberland – Children’s Lake
Cumberland – Doubling Gap Lake
Dauphin – Middletown Reservoir
Lancaster – Muddy Run Recreational Lake
Lebanon – Lions Lake
Lehigh – Lehigh Canal, Section 8
Montgomery – Deep Creek Dam/Green Lake
Schuylkill – Locust Lake
Registration will be accepted during March 23 at all sites, and on-line registration is available at: http://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouth.htm.
For Mentored Youth Trout Day contest rules, tag redemption forms and details, visithttp://fishandboat.com/MentoredYouthContest.htm.
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New Fishing Regulations for AEP Ponds in Ohio

English: Largemouth Bass Fishing

English: Largemouth Bass Fishing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

COLUMBUS, OH – New fishing regulations are now in place at American Electric Power (AEP) ponds and reservoirs, including AEP ReCreation Lands, Conesville Coal Lands and Avondale Wildlife Area for the 2013-2014 license year, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

Daily bag limits are enforced at all AEP ponds and reservoirs. The regulations apply to black bass and sunfishes in more than 350 ponds and lakes among more than 80,000 acres of AEP lands available for public fishing, hunting, hiking and camping in Ohio. New regulations are intended to help sustain the high-quality largemouth bass and bluegill fishing known in these waters.

The new black bass regulation is a 14-20-inch slot length limit developed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife that increases anglers’ chances of catching trophy bass. Anglers may keep two fish under 14 inches and one fish 20 inches or larger, for three fish per day (largemouth, smallmouth, or spotted bass, singly or in combination). However, anglers will not be allowed to keep any fish in the protected slot. This regulation applies to all AEP waters, and an angler’s daily limit will apply to all AEP lands collectively, and not just a particular pond or lake.

The new sunfish regulation is a 20-fish daily limit to ensure opportunities for a greater number of anglers to catch quality fish. This regulation will also apply to all AEP waters so an angler’s daily limit will apply to all AEP lands collectively, not just a particular pond or lake.

A permit is required to use AEP ponds and reservoirs. The permit is free and can be obtained from the AEP office in McConnelsville, AEP corporate offices, ODNR Division of Wildlife district offices, or any sporting goods and bait stores near the ReCreation areas.

New regulations were developed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife through review of data from fish surveys, creel surveys, consideration of management options, and extensive public input. More information can be found at wildohio.com in the 2013-2014 fishing regulations. Additional information about AEP lands is also available. An Ohio fishing license is required at all AEP ponds and reservoirs.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

 

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Fishing Regulations Lifted on Meadow Grounds Lake in PA.

Fishing Pond in Fulton County, PA

Fishing Pond in Fulton County, PA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HARRISBURG, Pa. (March 5) – The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) announced today that it has temporarily lifted all seasons, sizes and creel limits on Fulton County’s Meadow Grounds Lake in anticipation of the lake being fully drained within the next several months.
“We have chosen to temporarily lift the regulations in order to reduce the number of fish in the lake in anticipation of a fish salvage prior to a complete drawdown of the lake,” said Dave Miko, chief of the PFBC Division of Fisheries Management. “We want anglers to fish the water and make good use of as many fish as they can.”
The temporary regulations take effect immediately and will remain in place until further notice by the PFBC.
The PFBC announced on Feb. 25 that it would drain the lake because of deficiencies in the lake’s dam. During an inspection in December, the PFBC and the state Department of Environmental Protection found that existing seepage in the dam had become more severe.
“The condition of the dam’s structural integrity necessitates that a complete drawdown of the lake be performed so that further testing and analyses can be conducted,” said Andy Shiels, PFBC Deputy Director of Operations.
The drawdown began yesterday and is expected to take up to three months to complete. The lake will be drained at a rate of about two feet per week, depending on weather.
The lake will be drawn down indefinitely until funding can be identified and secured to make the necessary repairs. At this point, the PFBC does not have the money to make the repairs at this facility.
PFBC biologists are currently developing a fish salvage plan to remove and relocate as many fish as possible. Although fish salvages generally save a large number of fish, a significant amount will also perish.
“We will collect as many fish as we can through netting and electro-fishing, but it is impossible to capture all of them,” Miko said. “Fish die during any drawdown and salvage effort. Many hide around structures where we simply can’t reach them, and others become buried in the mud when they are slow to exit the lake with the remaining water. Anglers and the general public should expect to see this.”
The lake will remain open to public use until the water level reaches a point where it may be unsafe for anglers. At that point the lake will be closed and signs will be posting alerting anglers of the closing.
The 204-acre lake is located on State Game Lands 53 in Ayr Township, Fulton County. The dam and lake areas are leased to the PFBC by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.
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New Ohio Bass Regulations in Effect

COLUMBUS, OH – New statewide and specific site bass fishing regulations are now in effect for the 2013-2014 license year, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

 

Statewide, a new 12-inch minimum length limit has been implemented by the ODNR Division of Wildlife on all public waters for largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass where there are no other special regulations. The daily limit of five fish per day remains in effect for black bass, singly or in combination.

 

Some reservoirs that previously had special regulations were changed to the new statewide 12-inch length limit. The 12-15 inch slot length limit was removed from Timbre Ridge Lake, and 15-inch minimum length limits were removed from:

 

Caesar Creek Lake (Warren, Clinton and Greene counties),

Kenton Lake (Gallia County),

Lake Milton, including the Mahoning River connecting Berlin Lake and Lake Milton (Mahoning County),

Lake Vesuvius (Lawrence County),

Monroe Lake (Monroe County),

Monroeville Reservoir (Huron County),

Pike Lake (Pike County) and

Sippo Lake (Stark County).

 

Two new regulations have been incorporated to increase the size and number of bass. These special regulations include a reduced number of largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass that anglers may keep per day and split daily limits, where anglers may only keep a specified number of fish of a certain length.

 

The first regulation is a special 15-inch length limit with a four fish split daily limit. Anglers may keep two fish under 15 inches and two fish 15 inches or larger, for four fish per day. The split daily limit allows limited harvest of bass less than 15 inches to promote growth of bass to larger sizes. This regulation is referred to as a “15, 2-and-2.” It is in effect at these reservoirs:

 

Acton Lake (Preble and Butler counties),

Findley Lake (Lorain County),

Hargus Lake (Pickaway County),

Highlandtown Lake (Columbiana County),

Lake Snowden (Athens County),

New Lyme Lake (Ashtabula County),

Paint Creek Lake (Highland and Ross counties),

Salt Fork Lake (Guernsey County),

Silver Creek Lake (Summit County) and

Upper Sandusky No. 2 (Wyandot County).

 

The second split daily limit is referred to as a “Super Slot,” a 14-20-inch slot length limit intended to increase the chance of catching trophy bass. Anglers may keep two fish under 14 inches and one fish 20 inches or larger, for three fish per day. However, anglers are not allowed to keep any fish in the protected slot. This regulation will be limited to the following waters:

 

All American Electric Power (AEP) ponds and reservoirs, including AEP ReCreation Lands, Conesville Coal Lands and Avondale Wildlife Area, with all ponds and reservoirs included in each daily limit per angler (Coshocton, Guernsey, Muskingum, Morgan, Noble and Perry counties),

Belmont Lake (Belmont County),

Guilford Lake (Columbiana County),

Killdeer Plains Reservoir (Wyandot County),

Kiser Lake (Champaign County),

Long Lake (Summit County),

Oxbow Lake (Defiance County),

Spencer Lake (Medina County),

St. Joseph Wildlife Area ponds (Williams County),

Tycoon Lake (Gallia County),

Wingfoot Lake (Portage County) and

Wolf Run Lake (Noble County).

 

These adjustments in regulations were developed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife through an analysis of historical fish surveys, creel surveys and angler-reported tournament results, an evaluation of management options and fisheries objectives as well as extensive angler input through online surveys, creel surveys, open houses and meetings with sportsmen and women.

 

Ohio has other special regulations for black bass at a number of waters around the state that remain in effect. These include traditional 14-inch, 15-inch and 18-inch minimum length limits, and 12-15 inch slot length limits, all with five fish daily limits on Lake Erie and inland waters, and six fish daily limits on the Ohio River. Visit wildohio.com for more information.

 

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.


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24 Million Fish To Be Stocked in Ohio This Year: 1 Million Left


Fish from the park's hatchery
Fish from the park’s hatchery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

COLUMBUS, OH – The 2012 production season for the Division of Wildlife’s six state fish hatcheries is off to a great start, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

More than 23 million sport fish have been stocked statewide thus far with late summer and fall stockings yet to be completed. Unusually warm temperatures in early spring accelerated egg take and required fish management personnel to adapt quickly to the unexpected weather.

“Our hatchery staff has been really busy this year, and we are very happy with our production so far,” said Tim Parrett, fish hatchery program administrator with the Division of Wildlife. “The ultimate goal at the end of the day is for our anglers to have success.”

Hatchery crews began the stocking season in early March with catchable rainbow trout that kicked off the fishing season for many outdoor enthusiasts. These trout stockings continued through April with many of the stockings coinciding with youth or other special events, providing opportunities for beginning or novice anglers.

Walleye and saugeye were distributed statewide in April and May. Ohio’s saugeye program is very popular with inland anglers. This hybrid, a cross between female walleye and male sauger, has been stocked in many of Ohio’s inland lakes since the late 1970s. Saugeye have created a fishery in lakes where walleye stockings proved unsuccessful. Both saugeye and walleye are excellent table fare.

Steelhead are stocked in select tributaries of Lake Erie in April and May, and they were raised at the newly renovated Castalia State Fish Hatchery. This facility is the only steelhead hatchery operated by the Division of Wildlife. Ohio’s steelhead fishery is among the best in the Great Lakes region, attracting anglers from across the country.

Hybrid striped bass and yellow perch finished off this spring’s stockings. Late summer and fall plans include muskellunge, channel catfish, blue catfish and brown trout, further adding to the diversity of opportunities available for anglers.

Sales of fishing licenses along with the Sport Fish Restoration (SFR) program continue to fund the operation of the Division of Wildlife’s fish hatcheries. No state tax dollars are used for this activity. This is a user-pay, user-benefit program.

The SFR is a partnership between federal and state government, industry, and anglers/boaters. When anglers purchase rods, reels, fishing tackle, fish finders and motor boat fuel, they pay an excise tax.  The federal government collects these taxes and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service administers and disburses these funds to the state fish and wildlife agencies. These funds are used to acquire habitat, produce and stock fish, conduct research and surveys, provide aquatic education to youth and acquire and develop boat accesses.

Sport fish reared at state fish hatcheries provide opportunities for anglers, old and young alike, novice or expert. Whether people are looking for ways to spend leisure time with family or friends, pursue a trophy fish like the muskellunge, or wanting healthy, nutritious food for the table, Ohio offers it all.

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.com.

 

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