Month: December 2010

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Recycle your Tree This Year

A christmas tree.
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COLUMBUS, OH- Before sending your live-cut Christmas tree to the trash, remember that it can find new life after the holidays. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) reminds Ohioans that their trees can be recycled for a variety of uses including mulch, compost and wildlife habitat. “Mulching, chipping or composting Christmas trees after the holidays is a wise alternative to just throwing them in landfills,” said David Hanselmann, chief of the ODNR Division of Recycling & Litter Prevention. “Many Ohio communities are making it easy for residents to recycle cut Christmas trees by offering convenient drop-off locations and curbside pick up.” Many local park districts and communities shred Christmas trees for mulch and compost. Trees can even be transformed into wildlife habitat, providing shelter for some creatures during the winter months. Individuals living in communities without recycling programs might consider chipping and composting their holiday trees. Adding compost to home gardens improves soil quality, stores moisture and reduces weeds. Using Christmas trees to create outdoor brush piles makes ideal homes for wildlife. Trees can also be weighted down and sunk in farm ponds to attract fish and increase habitat. Before disposing of a live-cut Christmas tree, remember to remove all trimmings including tinsel, garland, lights and ornaments. Be sure you have proper permission before discarding your tree on public land, private land or in ponds. Discarding trees without permission could result in a litter violation. Call your local solid waste management district for information on where to recycle live-cut Christmas trees in your area. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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104,000 Pounds of Venison Donated to the Hungry

A white-tailed deer
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COLUMBUS, OH – Ohio deer hunters have donated more than 104,100 pounds of venison to local food banks so far this deer season, according to Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry (FHFH) and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

“I am happy to see this program continue to grow each year. Ohio hunters once again have shown their generosity so Ohio’s food pantries will receive the nutritious red meat they so desperately need,” said David M. Graham, chief of the Division of Wildlife.

The 104,100 pounds equals approximately 416,400 meals for needy Ohioans. To date, 2,082 deer have been donated with plenty of deer hunting opportunity left in the 2010-11 season. Last year at this time, 1,910 deer had been donated representing 95,500 pounds of venison.

Last year FHFH collected 116,750 pounds of venison from 2,336 deer through the entire season, which ran from September 2009 to February 7, 2010. Ohio county chapters with the highest numbers of deer donations so far are: Licking-208; Muskingum, Morgan and Perry-189; Coshocton, Tuscarawas, and Knox-160; Athens, Gallia, Hocking, Meigs, Vinton and Washington-137; and Franklin-121.

“We are thrilled that the partnership between FHFH and ODNR has resulted in greater numbers of donated deer – and meals provided – across Ohio again this year. With high unemployment in many areas fueling an even greater need for nutritious food items at food banks and feeding ministries, this growth could not have come at a better time, ” according to Josh Wilson, FHFH national operations director.

Hunters still have a weekend of deer-gun hunting, December 18-19, and eight weeks of archery hunting in Ohio. Archery season remains open until February 6. The statewide muzzleloader deer-hunting season will be held, January 8 – 11, 2011.

The Division of Wildlife collaborated with Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry in an effort to assist with the processing costs associated with donating venison to a food bank. So far, a $100,000 subsidy grant was provided in two $50,000 allotments that are to be matched with funds generated or collected by FHFH. The division subsidized this year’s FHFH operation as an additional deer management tool, helping wildlife managers encourage hunters to kill more does.

Venison that is donated to food banks must be processed by a federal, state or locally inspected and insured meat processor that is participating with FHFH. Hunters wishing to donate their deer to a food bank are not required to pay for the processing of the venison as long as the program has funds available to cover the cost. There are currently 71 participating meat processors across the state. A list is provided atwww.fhfh.org.

Currently there are 31 local chapters across the state with a need for more. Anyone interested in becoming a local program coordinator or a participating meat processor should visit the “Local FHFH” page atwww.fhfh.org. The Web page includes a current list of coordinators, program names and the counties they serve.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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Ice Safety Tips from Ohio DNR

Kairaus
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No Funny Title- Just the Facts.

COLUMBUS, OH – Ohioans are reminded to use extreme caution during winter while venturing onto frozen waterways and to be prepared to handle an emergency should someone fall through the ice, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).

As some of the lowest temperatures of the season arrive, some people may be tempted to venture out onto the ice and should be aware of basic safety tips, including being prepared for an emergency. ODNR offers these ice safety tips; additional tips can be found online at www.ohiodnr.com and through various other Internet web resources.

Ice Safety Tips:

  • Always remember that ice-covered water is never completely safe.
  • Anyone new to ice fishing, or interested in learning how to safely ice fish, should seek out a licensed ice-fishing guide. A list of certified guides is available at www.wildohio.com or by calling the ODNR Division of Wildlife, Sandusky office at (419) 625-8062. Ask at local bait shops about known areas of thin or dangerous ice.
  • Always go out with friends, letting others know when you will be on the ice and when you will return. Whenever possible, wrap a mobile phone in a plastic bag and take it with you.
  • Wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket or float coat. Life vests provide excellent flotation and protection from hypothermia.
  • Use safe alternatives to local streams or lakes for skating or sledding. Check with your local, state or metro park district to see where conditions are suitable for skating. Some state parks, including Delaware State Park in Delaware County and Dillon State Park in Muskingum County, offer free access to designated ice-skating areas.
  • Understand wind chill factors are relative temperature guides. Although a thermometer may read 40 degrees, a wind speed of 20 miles per hour can cause a body to lose heat as if the temperature was actually 18 degrees.
  • Carry two ice picks, screwdrivers or large nails to create leverage for pulling yourself out of the water. They are much more effective than bare hands. Also, carry a whistle or other noisemaker to alert people that you are in distress.
  • Dress in layers and add extra clothing for the head, neck, sides and groin, which are the primary heat-loss areas. Wool and modern synthetics are good fabric choices for clothing; cotton is slow to dry when wet.
  • Keep an extra set of clothes in your car in case you need dry clothing.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages. In addition to reducing reaction times, alcohol lowers your internal temperature and increases your chance of suffering hypothermia.
  • Never drive a vehicle, snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle onto ice. Leave this to professional guides. This is extremely dangerous and most insurance policies will not cover the vehicles of ice fishermen that have dropped through the ice.

The ODNR Division of Watercraft administers Ohio’s boating programs. The agency oversees watercraft registration and titling operations, provides funding to local communities for education, enforcement and boating access facilities, educates the public, and enforces boating laws on Ohio’s waterways. More information may be found online at www.ohiodnr/com/watercraft or by following the Division of Watercraft on Facebook or Twitter.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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Target Recalls Circo Kids Camping Combo for Fire Hazard

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Circo Children’s Space Camp Combo Pack

Units: 1,500

Importer: Target Corp., of Minneapolis, Minn.

Hazard: The floor of the tent failed a flammability test and poses a fire hazard.

Incidents/Injuries: None.

Description: The recall involves one model of the Circo Space Combo pack, which includes a children’s tent, sleeping bag, backpack and a headlamp. The tent is green and dark blue with planets, stars and figures printed on it. The packing box has the UPC number: 490911500926, DPCI: 091-15-0092.

Sold exclusively at: Target stores nationwide and online at www.target.com from September 2010 through October 2010 for approximately $25.

Manufactured in: Bangladesh

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled tents and return them to any Target store for a full refund or store credit.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Target at (800) 440-0680 between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s website at www.target.com

Recalled Children's Camping Gear Picture

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Northeast Ohio Blows Away Those Turkeys

Male wild turkey in Brookline, Massachusetts, ...
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COLUMBUS, OH- Ohio’s fall wild turkey season ended November 28 with 1,336 birds killed during the seven-week season. Ashtabula County led the state with 75 birds taken, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.  Last year, 2,180 birds were taken.

“The decline in the fall turkey harvest we observed from 2009 to 2010 was not unexpected. Acorn mast crop failures like we observed in 2009 typically result in increased hunter success and higher fall turkey harvests because turkeys feed in open areas, such as agricultural fields and pastures,” said Wildlife Biologist Mike Reynolds. “Bumper acorn crops like we’ve experienced in 2010 often lead to reduced hunting success and harvests because turkeys are feeding on acorns in the forest, and are often widely scattered and difficult for hunters to locate.”

The fall turkey season which ran October 9 through November 28, allowed hunters the choice of pursuing a bird with a shotgun, muzzleloading shotgun, bow or crossbow. Hunters had 48 counties in which to pursue a wild turkey of either sex.

Before the start of this fall’s hunting season, Ohio’s estimated wild turkey population was around 230,000. As many as 20,000 people, not counting private landowners hunting on their own property, enjoyed Ohio’s fall wild turkey season.

The top 10 counties for fall turkey harvest were: Ashtabula-75, Licking-57, Trumbull-56, Knox-55, Coshocton-54, Highland-52, Tuscarawas-49, Clermont-48, Ashland-46 and Geauga-45.

Hunters who wish to share their success can submit a photo of themselves and the turkey they killed this year to wildohio.com.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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Holiday Specials at Ohio State Parks

The Lodge at Geneva on the Lake
Image by kuddlyteddybear2004 via Flickr

COLUMBUS, OH – Stressed holiday shoppers looking for great gift ideas or for a relaxing getaway for holiday cheer can turn to Ohio State Parks for convenient shopping solutions and overnight stays.

An Ohio State Parks gift card is an appealing choice for anyone who likes to play outdoors or unwind in comfort.  Gift cards can be redeemed for camping, getaway rentals, cottage rentals or overnight stays in eight of Ohio’s luxurious state park lodges.  They can also be used for golfing at Ohio State Parks’ six public courses, for boat rentals at some state park marinas, or for food and merchandise purchases.

Ohio State Park gift cards, which are available in any denomination of $5 or more, can be purchased on-line from the state parks website, or in person at any state park office, or by calling 1-866-644-6727.

Ohio State Parks merchandise is now available on-line for the convenience of gift givers who prefer to provide a wrapped package.  Specialty apparel, books, toys, outdoor gear and nature themed items are offered through the on-line store at the state parks website, www.ohiostateparks.org.  All profits from the sale of these items benefit Ohio State Parks.

A variety of seasonal promotions and discounted rates on overnight stays are offered through the winter at state park lodges and cottages.  New Year’s Eve celebrations, along with specially priced theme weekends and family friendly packages are scheduled at the lodges at Burr Oak, Deer Creek, Geneva, Hueston Woods, Maumee Bay, Mohican, Punderson, Salt Fork and Shawnee.  Winter discounts at the state park cottages at Buck Creek, Cowan Lake, Dillon, Hocking Hills, Lake Hope, Mohican, Pike Lake and Pymatuning are $20 off the regular nightly rate on Sunday through Thursday nights, and $10 off on Friday and Saturday nights, January through March.  Information and reservations are available on the state parks website.

Customers who stay in Ohio State Park campgrounds or in select state park cottages can also receive extra value through the Ohio State Parks Rewards Card.  When they reserve their campsite or cottage, they can request a Rewards Card and earn points toward a free stay during a future state park visit.  Rewards card holders can also receive 25% off the regular nightly rate for overnight stays at the lodges at Burr Oak, Deer Creek, Hueston Woods, Maumee Bay, Mohican, Punderson, Salt Fork and Shawnee through April 1, 2011, based on availability.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at www.ohiodnr.gov.

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Castalia Trout Lottery 2011

COLUMBUS, OH- Controlled trout-fishing opportunities on Cold Creek, one of Ohio’s most unique streams, await fishing enthusiasts who enter a special lottery conducted by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

A half-mile section of the creek, located at the Castalia State Fish Hatchery in ErieCounty, will again be open to a limited number of anglers on selected dates between March 28 – October 28, 2011. Anglers interested in fishing the stream must submit an application form and a non-refundable $5 application fee between December 1, 2010 and January 31, 2011 in order to be eligible for the random drawing. Application forms can be obtained by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE. Save money by applying online at wildohio.com for only $3 per application.

Only one application is allowed per person. Application information can be obtained from the ODNR Division of Wildlife Web site wildohio.com or by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE.

There will be two seasons: one for adults (March 28 – June 2 and August 22 – October 28), and one for youths age 16 and under (June 6 – August 19). Approximately 90 adult and 50 youth permits will be issued. Individuals selected to participate will be allowed to bring two adults and three youths under the age of 16 (no more than six people total). Participation is determined by a computer-generated random drawing, which will be held in early March. Successful applicants will be notified by mail of their fishing dates. Applicants not chosen will not be notified.

Special fishing rules will be in effect for this event to ensure that a quality fishing experience is maintained throughout the season. One of these special rules prohibits catch-and-release fishing, with wildlife officials requiring that anglers keep all fish they catch. The daily bag limit will be five trout per angler.

Anglers will be required to check in at the hatchery upon arrival and check out at the end of their session. Fishing sessions will be open from 7 a.m.to noon. Anglers age 16 and older will need a valid 2011 Ohio fishing license.

An Ohio resident annual fishing license costs $19; a one-day fishing license costs $11. Those who purchase a one-day fishing license may later return it to a license agent to receive credit toward purchase of an annual fishing license.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.


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